YBCA Artist to Artist: Marcela Pardo Ariza & Andrew Wilson | Bay Area Now 8

YBCA Artist to Artist: Marcela Pardo Ariza & Andrew Wilson | Bay Area Now 8



I'm Suzy I'm one of the co curators of this exhibition Bay Area no.8 with Martin Strickland thank you for coming and being part of this conversation which is really exciting with Marcella and Andrew here I love what both of you were saying about kinship and queerness and I think there's so much of that in this exhibition particularly in both of your works and a lot of the works in this room so if you haven't gone through and seen the exhibition I encourage you all to do that now I'll give it over to Marcella and Andrew what I really want to start with first is like your use of the archives so I know in your work there's a lot of play between this kind of older archive that's non HD archived with these HD images and then also your means of framing alright so like the the way that you build your frames and I wonder what this means in terms of like queer space queer archive and this kind of new or like other mythologies base so I started looking at all these archives in the Bay Area which there are a lot of in the public library and the GLBT Historical Society and and there were all these archives that I've never seen before and I was just kind of blown away but like the access to all these images and one of the things that really struck me was that you know besides the fact that you have to ask for one box at a time there are all these systems in which archives are organized that are very arbitrary but like somebody just came up with and then they just kind of stay that way and those systems are really allow you to like freely access this this you know these statements of the past so in a way I was trying to think about creating like a historically impossible kinship from queers from the past like fears from the present and have them occupied the same moment in time in like a photograph right so which is kind of like the magical part of that genre is that you can just make anything happen and I feel like that happens with the frame as well like the framing photography is always really uptight and people are like you have to hang it up this way like this is how it's done you know I was working with a professional framer to do these frames and like it was interesting for him to be like why do you want to do that so it was this kind of like collaboration where he like is an expert on this field but he's like never tried to do something outside of it and like that happens with archives they just get like organizing I'm very a professional kind of like academic way that like somebody made up and it's just kind of like let's like have fun with it let's be dynamic and let's make this history is kind of like correlate a little bit more yeah so one of the things that Andrews been doing with his work is that he comes to the gallery like three days a week four days a week four hours and works on finishing these pieces I feel like you really get an insight on like how people are responding to your work in real time it's also like a durational type of performance but or like people might read it as such but yeah it's not really like plays as such for you so I just want to hear like how are you seeing people reacting to your work how are you seeing people reacting to you in the space does it give you like a new insight on what an audience can be when people come in the gallery they're like when they see a human in the gallery they're like I can talk to you because you're a human right and I I think that that's an interesting dynamic and then there's a moment of refusal so I don't even acknowledge their presence and sometimes that makes people actually just walk by because they're like oh he doesn't like me right there's a strange psychology that happens and when we're not acknowledged in space there's also folks that that interject and they're like hey I got a question for you or hey can I interrupt you like no you can't interrupt me I'm busy right if I'm talking with an audience member or a viewer or someone entering the gallery space and I'm the kind of didactic tool that unlocks the work in new ways right much like the tag does and so I think for me there's a tag there like everyone else has a tag so read the tag and you can understand the work and interpret it in different ways you know let's say this was a performance that was like musical or vocal or like very embodied like dance or something like that you're not gonna just stop the dancer or stop the vocalist in the middle of their performance and ask a question and so I kind of feel the same way so there's an interesting tension that happens in this space when folks do you know come in but what has been dope I've talked to maybe two or three different classes that have come in and one student asks like if all of these caftans are for each person aboard the slave vessel Brooks then what are you right the one who's making the one who's producing I never I didn't think about that I just got to make it dude I have to make it but it makes me think about like the ledger or the record keeper or the overseer or you know what is my role in the production of these you know kind of spear containers you did the New York arts program I think the year before I did the New York arts program which is crazy because the world is tiny and so I'm wondering with that program what still stays with you you know way I mean I felt so lucky because he taught me like all this pragmatic ways in which there are world works like you know I I didn't really know much about galleries and they'll be like yeah this really intimidating space you can enter it needs free we went to so many artists studios and that was those were my first like studio visits ever and it was just like so generous I everyone was like Shane you know like what we do now right like sharing their experiences and sure in their process and I was working with this photographer Sebastian Bremer at the time who like paints on photographs and what was kind of like more moving about that was that like we developed this very like mentorship relationship and and I started kind of like babysitting for him so I like God like this personal insight into his life which really like gave me this insight into what is an artist's life really like and seeing how he was kind of managing different things and applying to grants and like how he was archiving his work also I feel like all this little like nuances of knowledge kind of showed up later on when I was in grad school and I was like I know how to do that like I know how to like moving these spaces a little bit more because of this experience maybe you can tell us a little bit about how that experience was for you I interned with Fred Wilson I was like super dope it's like this like sweetest dude ever and like we would get hot chocolate and expresso and talk a whole lot of math I also was really interested in like the barber shop and I did a whole lot work around the barbershop and I went to these like barber battles it's like so cool I never even knew a thing but like theyd is like they'll take a venue and then they'll have like lightning rounds they'll have like cut a high-top fade or do an embellishment or like all this crazy stuff and so I was like photographing at a barber battle which was amazing what New York arts program taught me it was just like how to hustle because we didn't have studio space so I was like using the boiler room to dry my cyanotypes but darkroom open like I was printing in New Jersey because my dad lived in Jersey so I would spend the weekends in Jersey my family and yeah that was that was a wild wild experience what is your sweet favorite sweet confectionary delight tiramisu is perfect Amy made up here I mean super my birthday and he was so good I loved it do you have Rachel's in the studio and if not in the studio just like how do you keep going in your life in like a place that like this place artists all the time I'm like how do you like cope with being here one thing that I do all the time is when I start new projects I sweep my studio and I guess it's like a way to like clean my space or to like restart or to reset I mean there's also like a lot of unfinished things everywhere and it's in the studio I feel like most studios are like that the folks who are working artists yeah that's it yeah thanks y'all you

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