WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR ART? SHARE IT.

WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR ART? SHARE IT.


– Hey everyone, its
Nicholas Wilton at Art2Life and today I want to talk about sharing, and sharing your art. I get the challenge of encouraging people to do this in programs and courses. A lot of people would prefer not to and hold back from doing this. And of course that’s fine, but I think one of the reasons we don’t like to share so much and or there’s a resistance to it has to do with feeling we wanna be perfect or that what we show is at a certain level even though for most of us our art never really is at
the level we want it to be. There’s always a big gap
there or certainly a gap. When I first did CVP, the Creative Visionary Program,
the first time we ran it I put together all these videos and it wasn’t something that I do a lot. Like I’m more used to it
now standing in front, pretending I’m talking to you so I feel like I’m talking to you, but actually you’re just a camera. But I can feel it now, but
in the beginning was hard and I remember I had to. I created the course, and I had to create a sales pitch kind of. You know, like this is the program, and this is how much it costs, and I hope you buy it, you know. Which is really a weird
thing to talk about. It was something that I had to share, but I wasn’t good at this, I’m an artist, I’m not a sales person. So it was really hard,
and it wasn’t very good. And I used it anyway, that video, because I wanted to do the course and a lot of people watched it. And most everyone, it was fine. I felt sick about it, but it worked and people came to the
program and everything. And no one had a problem with it even though it wasn’t very good and I really didn’t wanna share this. But one person that didn’t
like it, one vocal person, and probably a lot of
people didn’t like it but one person said so. And it was really you know, criticism, like Nick stick to teaching, don’t do that because you’re clearly not good at that. And don’t, you’re fine when your teaching, but don’t do this, that
it really looks awkward and you’re not very confident. Which is all true, Ferris,
he held cardboard out for me and I read all the statements and I made that video
out of like 50 starts. It was the worst. So it was really painful to hear this and to have someone notice
it and say it, right? But, and I think this goes to he point of stay protected so you
don’t expose yourself to this. This is the worst, being called out on something you’re not good at. But then the more I thought about it, the more I realized like well, I’m not good at doing that. I haven’t done it before
and so I’m not good. I’m really good at teaching art, but I’m not good at at this. And I actually went back and forth emails and saying like I don’t, yeah I don’t do this really
well ’cause I’m just learning. It was a real big turning point for me because I teach people to
put themselves out there, especially with sharing their art, and even if the nightmare comes true that somebody points out
that you’re not as good as they think you should be or whatever, its kind of not the end of the world because you’re learning. And this is my point:
that you do it anyway, and its so, so important
to share your work. And I wanted to give you a few other reasons why its so important to do this. When you embrace the fact
that you are learning, which is what I did,
you’re kind of bulletproof. Like its only people that pretend or have such an investment
in being a certain way or looking like they
know what they’re doing. Its okay if you don’t
know what you’re doing and you’re open about it. Everyone can kind of accept that. So if you embrace this
idea that art making and anything we do,
anything we’re learning, you get to be a beginner,
we all get to be beginners. And I’m saying this because
I want especially beginners to put their work out
there, to do it anyway, to share it on Facebook,
put it out on Instagram. Which sort of segues into my second point, which is the reason its
important once you get over this is that you get feedback,
you get a feedback loop. You get a response, and that’s hard to do when you’re in your studio by yourself. Now it doesn’t matter so much if 50 people like this and five don’t. But sometimes and this
happens to me all the time, a lot of people will say
something about what you’re making and it gives you another
angle to look at your work. You get this bigger
objectivity as a result of it and that can be helpful. We’re not making art to
get favorable comments, but mostly you will because
people are interested in what you’re doing and its admirable that you’re trying to make something that hasn’t been made before. So I encourage people,
especially beginners, which they’re the ones that
have the hardest time doing it ’cause they don’t feel very confident. But if you wanna speed your learning up, if you want to increase the
rate of your improvement, try to find some avenue
to share your work. I mean share it with your friends, put some of them up in your house so the you know, the
Federal Express guy sees it, you know or your family members see it, that’s where it starts. Try to realize that its a part I believe of your growth and it speeds up your
progress tremendously. The idea of giving,
which is my third point, giving first, sharing something. I know it feels vulnerable and personal, but its a gift, its an offering where you’re not sure what
you’re gonna get in return if anything, but you’re doing it anyway. And this creates kind
of a call and response, a reciprocity of an exchange that you give something and you kind of get something in return. Its a call and response
super, super helpful. And because you don’t know
what is going to happen, often you’re surprised
and there’s a curiosity and a wonder that’s
created in the response of whatever you’re putting out. When you just give, you get
surprising things come back. You never know what’s gonna happen and those feelings of
curiosity and wonder, they’re a huge piece of art making. That’s a lot of what we
wanna create in our art, in the viewer, in ourselves. So this fits in beautifully
with how we wanna feel. Its almost like a whole
approach to living, where you give first and
get after no matter what. You’re not doing something for a reason, its just you’re just putting it out there and that generosity cultivates
certain things to occur. I do these videos, I do them, I love this because I
get so much back from it. I learn so much but its a give I’m not, I’m just making
these and all kinds. My whole teaching platform
is based on this approach. It began with sharing my work and then sharing a way
to approach art making and offer a course. I mean at each step it was
always the same feeling: Ugh, I just don’t even want to do this, I’m just gonna post it anyway. Anyway, so those are some thoughts on why if you’re not sharing maybe you can move
towards that a little bit and you know, create the
conditions for wonder, curiosity, and speed up the progression of your art. I’d love to hear your comments about what you have posted
and what was difficult for you and how you overcame it. This is how I learn and
a lot of other people learn on Sunday. So and also for those
of you who are new here, we have a free color PDF
that you can download that has a lot of tips around color. So go ahead and download that,
the link is right below here. Thanks a lot, and I hope you have a really, really great Sunday. Okay. Hey everyone if you found this helpful, I have a whole lot more to teach, share, and inspire you
with every single week. So please join the
Art2Life YouTube channel by clicking the subscribe button below. Okay great, lets do this.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *