Using Art and Science to Restore Coral Reef Habitats

Using Art and Science to Restore Coral Reef Habitats


– [Colleen Flanigan]
In our short life span, how much do we value living in harmony and beauty and abundance with what we’ve been given? (soft music) Nature is my sanctuary
and my place of spirit. With climate change causing the oceans to increase in temperature, the coral reefs have been dying off at a much more rapid rate. Coral reefs – though they cover a very small percentage of the ocean – they are responsible for creating habitat for over 25% of marine species. I work with coral reef restoration, approaching it from a background
in sculpture and design. Zoe, A Living Sea
Sculpture is a five-meter by three-meter by two-meter sculpture. It’s made out of rebar
and expanded metal mesh. The projects that we’re making here at the UC Santa Cruz lab – the accumulates are going to be reference and scalable models that then we weld. And I’m just playing with fan shapes and folded shapes and ring shapes. (mellow music) I get to see how the variation and the voltage and
ampage in the water flow – in the different variables
that are happening from a flow-through tank – how does that affect the growth of these different
small-scale experiments? When I’ve painted or sculpted
purely to make objects, it’s a really wonderful experience, but once I entered into
working with nature, that constant curiosity of: What does this other
organism need or want? How can we collaborate and work together? By integrating art,
science, and technology, can I be part of the bigger
dream for our survival? (bells ringing) (water flowing)

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