SP Artisan Temperament

SP Artisan Temperament



Welcome to “What’s My Personality Type?” In this video, we’ll learn about another
aspect of personality theory called “Temperament.” Temperament refers to your core needs that
drive your behavior. Within the sixteen Myers-Briggs personality
types, there are four temperaments, the Guardian, the Artisan, the Rational, and the Idealist. This video will focus on the strengths and
blind spots of the Artisan. Artisans are those people whose second letter
of their MBTI type is “S” for sensing and whose last letter is “P” for perceiving. So the types that fit the Artisan category
are ISTP, ISFP, ESTP, and ESFP. While these types can look very different
from each other, they all have some common core needs. The Artisans’ core needs are for action,
freedom, fun, and practical results. They have an ability to see situations clearly
and act in the moment. This makes them flexible and resourceful people
who are quick to adapt and have the courage to take risks. All Artisans have certain strengths, although
they may look a bit different according to the individual. But for the most part, Artisans tend to be
fun and spontaneous while at the same time being practical and efficient. They are the doers of the world who would
rather take action than spend a lot of time talking about and planning something. Because they value fun and freedom, they enjoy
working with others but not necessarily following established rules. They are really good at quickly figuring out
the best way to accomplish a task, so they prefer to do what they know will work, which
may not always be the standard procedure, but their way almost always ends up being
the better, most efficient way to do something. Artisans are focused on the sensory world
and are very aware of their bodies, so they tend to be excellent at working with their
hands or doing other kinds of physical activities, such as sports, or building and fixing objects. And they often excel in the arts such as pottery,
dance, painting because it allows them to express themselves in a physical way, which
is why they are called the Artisan. And because of their ability to quickly read
situations and react appropriately in the moment, Artisans are great in crisis situations,
remaining calm and knowing just what to do, so other people tend to rely on them to deal
with emergencies in a practical way. However, all Artisans can have some blind
spots as well. Because of their focus on the present moment,
they don’t always think ahead to potential future implications of what they are doing. This tendency can cause them to sometimes
be too impulsive and seem unpredictable to others. In fact, since they rely on concrete, practical
information, planning too far in the future is often difficult for them because they don’t
have enough information to predict what decision they want to make. This reluctance to plan can be frustrating
for other types who want a firm commitment from them. Their unwillingness to follow procedures when
they think they have a better solution can also cause issues when standard measures are
supposed to be taken. And because Artisans are so practical-minded
and focused on fixing specific problems in the present moment, they may have trouble
seeing the big picture and connecting the issue at hand to a potential larger issue. This lack of focus on patterns or abstract
theories can cause them to constantly have to put out fires or deal with small issues
while ignoring solutions that may resolve the larger problem. Partly because of this day-by-day approach,
Artisans can also get bored easily if nothing exciting is happening in the moment, so they
tend to lose interest in activities once the crisis is over or when systems are running
smoothly. This need for variety and excitement may make
them want to either create drama or look for things to fix, even if everything seems to
be going well. And while Artisans are usually really fun
to be around, their playfulness can sometimes make them appear to be trivializing the concerns
of others. Now not all Artisans will exhibit these behaviors,
but they may be more likely than other types to have this mindset, so it’s important
to be aware of tendencies that may not always be helpful, especially at times when there
is a need to step back and look at the big picture or plan for the future. So if you’re an Artisan and find that you
have some of these blind spots, you can grow and develop your type by taking some time
to look at how situations you are dealing with today connect with circumstances in the
past and potential issues in the future. Your ability to sense current conditions will
help others to see clearly where they are, and together, you can work on planning for
where you want to be. So what are some ways you can build on your
amazing strengths as an Artisan to overcome some of your blind spots? Here are some activities you can try to help
yourself build up your planning muscles and improve your ability to think ahead:
First, the next time you find yourself in a situation where you would immediately react,
stop for a moment and process not only what is happening right now, but also try to think
about why it might be happening. Then come up with an action you can take to
address the larger issue. For instance, if people you supervise keep
coming to you with questions or problems, instead of just dealing with the immediate
crisis, look at how you can address those issues in a more holistic way. Ask yourself if they might have constant questions
because their job duties aren’t clear or if they haven’t had proper training. Perhaps you can offer workshops, provide written
manuals for common questions, or match up new employees with more experienced colleagues
as mentors. These actions will help to not only solve
current problems but will also prevent future issues from occurring. Second, try to work on long range planning
and making a commitment to follow through on your plans. Start with making a long-term goal. You can even make it something fun that you
want to do, such as traveling abroad. Set a date that you want to accomplish this
goal by. Then figure out all the steps you need to
take to accomplish your goal and set mini deadlines for yourself. So for example, if you want to travel by summer,
you may need to start saving in January, apply for a passport in February, book your flight
by March, reserve a hotel room by April, and so on. Keep track of your progress and be sure that
you are keeping your eye on the goal. Once you are there, you probably won’t want
a strict schedule to follow so that you have the freedom to explore, but try to plan at
least a couple of activities in advance such as getting theater tickets or scheduling a
fun tour before you leave. This way, you won’t miss out on events that
needed to be scheduled ahead of time. Finally, do some activities that will flex
your intuitive muscles. Try solving logic puzzles, writing short stories
or poetry, or joining a book club. You can also take a class in a theoretical
topic such as sociology or literature. The point is to get you thinking about ideas
bigger than what is happening in your immediate surroundings and imagining possibilities for
the future. You will still be the go-to person to fix
what’s broken in the moment, but when you try to become more big-picture, you will expand
your horizons beyond the day-to-day and get better at predicting outcomes for the future. I hope you found this information on the Artisan
temperament helpful. If you want more videos on personality type,
subscribe to our channel below. Thanks for watching!

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