SIMPLE WATERCOLOR LANDSCAPE PAINTING for Beginners | Watercolor trees

SIMPLE WATERCOLOR LANDSCAPE PAINTING for Beginners | Watercolor trees


Hey there, my name is Françoise, welcome
to my channel ! For today’s video, I made a simple watercolor
landscape painting for beginners. I’ll be guiding you through this easy painting step
by step, so don’t worry if watercolor is still pretty new to you.
I’m working on a 5 by7 piece of watercolor paper and I’ll be using paintbrushes of different
sizes today. I linked all my supplies in the description below so feel free to check them
out ! If you’re getting started with watercolor, just keep in mind that even though it’s totally
fine to use whatever it is that you already have, quality supplies and especially paper
tend to make a huge difference with the way your strokes and techniques are going to turn
out, so if you’re not seeing the results you would like, don’t get discrouraged and instead,
experiment with different supplies. First things first, I like to tape my paper
down to a firm surface with some masking tape, and I also do this because I get these crisp
edges with tape. I was looking for originality for this painting,
since I did it for a challenge on Instagram based on the theme « lost in the woods »,
so I decided to splatter some masking fluid on my page first just to get paper white splatters
all over later on. I splattered my masking fluid a bit more towards
the bottom, which is going to be the darkest area, because I really want the white of the
paper to contrast with the darkest layer of paint.
To splatter the masking fluid, I’m using a stiff old brush I rub my finger against. I
try to make small splatters and bigger ones. It all depends on how much pressure is used
when rubbing your finger and also, how much masking fluid is on the brush.
If you don’t have masking fluid, you can do this step last with white gouache or with
a white gel pen on a dry surface and you will get a similar look.
Once the masking fluid had dried, I wet my paper generously with clean water and a big
brush, it doesnt really matter what size your brush is, but bigger is always better when
working on a large surface. So I wet the paper evenly and I try to avoid any puddles. Now
it’s wet you want to start painting right away. For my background, I was looking for
a luminous look, so I decided to use yellow. I dropped some paint everywhere, and here
just have fun with this step and don’t overthink it. What matters here is to make sure the
paint you drop is kind of runny for this very first layer, and also make sure to leave some
blank areas to maximize contrast and light. Once this is done, I usually like to drop
more of that paint only a bit more saturated, and because I felt it still wasn’t contrasted
enough, I added a bit of gold ochre towards the edges of the sheet. Gold ochre is darker
than yellow, and it looks like yellow ochre. And if you don’t have either, orange or even
red would work here, as long as you don’t overload the background with these.
Because I’m not super patient, I like to use a hair drier or a heat gun to make my paint
dry faster and now everything is dry, we can start painting the trees !
We’re going to paint the trees in layers to create depth and the illusion of distance,
which means that our first layer of trees will be really light, making them look like
they’re in a distance, and the last layer will be much darker, to make them appear like
they’re in the foreground. For the first layer, I used yellow again,
with just a bit of gold ochre to make them look more interesting than if I was just using
one solid color. I am using a medium sized round brush and
what’s important here is to use a brush that gets to a fine tip like mine, again all links
are in the description if you need more information on what you can get. And with the fine tip,
I start tracing the top of the tree and I press gently on my brush as I get closer to
the base of the tree. Then ,because it dries really fast, I trace some branches and then
I add a bit of my gold ochre on one side of the tree and at the bottom also to create
a bit of interest there. I didn’t want to paint a stiff looking ground,
I’m not sure I’m using the right term here but you get the idea, so I faded the bottom
of my trees quickly, before it dries, with more paint, just dabbing the brush around
and underneath the trunk. I realized after it dried that it kind of
looks like the bare trees lost their leaves and those leaves are piled up on the ground,
that was not my original intent but I like the look.
I repeated this exact same process 3 more times.
The second layer was done with gold ochre, but again use orange or red if you don’t have
anything close to yellow ochre. The difference with this layer is that I made those trees
a bit higher, a bit darker and for that I just used less water and more paint in my
brush, and I added a bit of a color called Indian red, it’s a kind of a brownish red
that you could get mixing red and brown. The base of the trees is also closer to the bottom
of my sheet now, and I’m going to keep doing this with the next layers.
Layer number 3 is Indian red, with a bit of brown at the base and side of the trees.
And finally, layer number 4 is my darkest color I was talking about previously, and
that’s Van Dyke brown. Now you can see that the base of this first layer is even closer
to the bottom of my sheet, the top of the trees reach the top of the page,and the paint
is a lot darker. To darken this even more, I used some neutral tint, which is close to
grey or black and I mixed that to my brown color to make it way darker and create great
contrast. One thing I didn’t mention for the trees is
to try and trace them with a relaxed grip, not a stiff one, and you will notice they
look a lot better. In fact, the more you have fun with watercolor, the better the experience.
Everytime I try to control my strokes too much or my paint too much, I notice I don’t
get the results that I want unlike other mediums like graphite for instance.
Now for the girl, I freehanded this little silhouette and because I didn’t want to ruin
my paper, I transfered it onto my painting with some tracing paper. Of course if you
feel comfortable drawing it right there on your painting, then it’s great and a good
time saver. I removed the masking fluid I had applied
at the beginning to make sure the silhouette would look solid and very well defined.
To paint her, I used some brown mixed to my indian red and then I added the branch in
her hand to make it look more fun. I used a brush with a fine tip here and I tried using
a very saturated mix of paint too. I had fun with more splatters to complete
the painting, and what I used is some of that dark brown paint and then some Indian red
paint that I splattered all around the painting, and there you go  with this watercolor landscape!
If you enjoyed this simple watercolor landscape painting for beginners, please let me know
in the comments below, give this video a thumbs up and share it with your friends. If you
have any questions regarding this painting, drop me a note in the comments so I can help
you out. And also, don’t forget to subscribe and hit the notification bell for more watercolor
techniques and ideas. See you next time !

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