PAINTING A BRAMBLING 🌲 | Painting a Fantasy Creature Head

PAINTING A BRAMBLING 🌲 | Painting a Fantasy Creature Head


Greetings and welcome to The Dream
Syndicate. In today’s video we’re painting a fantasy creature head as we
work on the Brambling. If you want to join me in Making the Imaginary Reality, don’t forget to subscribe and hit the bell icon. Our brambling heads all sculpted and ready to be painted. So I’m laying down this medium brown all over it to give me a base tone to work off of. This base coat is a raw umber
straight from the tube. I’m being really cautious to try and not get any of the pigment on the resin eyes, but that’s likely to happen anyway and I’ll
just have to clean it up later. As predicted there’s a little bit of
paint on the eye so I have to use my wet brush here and then a little piece of
paper towel that I can dab away that little mistake. Ok we have the base coating
all done on the head and next we’ll start on the hands and the feet. Now I’m
going to use this sort of duller grade I’ll tone on our fantasy creature. I’m using a sort of lighter greener
color on the palms of the hands and I’m also gonna do that on the bottom of the
feet. The nice thing about applying an
undertone is in areas where I apply the overtone paint thinner, you can actually
see some of that brown showing through which is a nice effect. Here I’m starting to create a bit of a
shadow under the eyebrow with this darker color. A human face has zones that tend to stand out like the cheeks or the nose or the forehead, so I’m trying to
imply the same thing with our little brambling fantasy creature here. The inside of a human or even a
creature’s ear is gonna get less direct sunlight so that’s also likely to
be a lot lighter. Now I’m gonna lighten up around our art doll’s eye orbitals. If you’re unfamiliar with the term eye orbitals, don’t worry- it’s just a
fancy way of saying the bones around your eye. I want to give this art doll head a bit
of visual interest and kind of use a fun color, so I’m using this sort of off
purple tone, which will coordinate with the brown well. Here we’ll give the upper eyelid a bit
of a visual punch. The upper eyelid is usually darker than the lower one but
they’re usually a related color to one another. I’m actually painting this a
little lighter than I ultimately intend it to be because I’m gonna go over
it all with a dark brown ink wash and then I’ll make everything a lot more
dark and unified. Since bramblings are hard to observe in their natural habitat,
I brought in a piece of wood to use as reference. So I was looking at that while
I was painting and do you have this idea that a tree is just a brown color like a
brown crayon, but in reality it’s a lot more subtle and dull- in a way, it’s
closer to a gray tone with a hint of brown to it. When I paint character’s heads, it’s usually
a process of using these garish colors on various areas of the face and then I
start to tone it down and make everything harmonized a little better as
I progress in the painting. Here I’m lightly brushing on some brown to create
some variation on the sculpture. I do something similar with this dull green
tone. Now I’m taking a very watery wash and
putting it over top of the ears and other lighter parts of the face like the
eye orbital. Next I’m going to mix some dark brown
ink with some water and create a wash and try to bring up some of the lines of
the bark like skin that I carved into the character. When you’re painting in an
ink wash expected to get on your hands and also around the surface where you’re
working. You want to let the ink set for about
three to five minutes and then gently wipe it away with something like a moist
paper towel or a q-tip and kind of wipe across the surface not with the line or
the grain that you’re actually trying to apply it to. With the size of the sculpture that I’m
trying to use this technique with, I had to apply the washes in sections. With other art doll builds I might be a
little more anxious about getting anything on the clothes, but with this
character, I kind of wanted his clothes to be spattered and dirty and scruffy
anyway- so if any ink dotted onto the clothes I actually thought I might
enhance it. Now I’m going to go back and highlight
the eye sockets again with a bit of that purple since that brown ink wash really
took the color out of it. Similarly, I’ll reestablish some of those
tones on the eyelids as well. Now let’s give our little woodland fey
sprite some pearly white teeth. To finish our creature off, I’m going to
take some of these silk flowers I got from an art supply store and use them to
attach to the edge of the branches. I’ll just remove this little backing piece
here and make a little slit with an exacto knife on the base of the stem. If
I were being safety first I would do this directly on top of my cutting mat
instead doing it with my hands in the air. Putting a little Fabric-Tac inside
that stem and then I can push it in with a little scrap of wire that I have.
Sometimes it’s handy to keep around little odds and ends of things so you
can use them like that. Here we’ll just press on these three flowers onto the branches. And here we have our finished fey creature- a Brambling. Thanks so much for watching. If you want to join me in Making the Imaginary a Reality, don’t forget to subscribe and hit the bell icon. Until next time, Make Believe.

4 thoughts on “PAINTING A BRAMBLING 🌲 | Painting a Fantasy Creature Head

  1. Thanks for spending some time getting to know the brambling! 🌲 If you want to see the finished art I made with him or want to purchase a print of him, you can find it here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/601530840/brambling-fey-fantasy-fine-art-85×11?ref=shop_home_active_6

    Music Credits

    "Darkest Child" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)

    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

    "Pooka" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)

    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

  2. Try adding a drop of dish soap to your washes. it helps break down the surface tension of the water and allows it to flow into those recesses that much easier! Great job, Ryan!

  3. Gotta say I really enjoy watching these. But I do have a suggestion, music, it might be just me but I get really tired of hearing the same short sequence after a minute or two.

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