Organic Japanese Tea Production | Interview with Tyas Sosen about artisan tea and The Tea Crane

Organic Japanese Tea Production | Interview with Tyas Sosen about artisan tea and The Tea Crane



what people drank 100 years ago was organic tea was nothing as sweet as that we know today most Japanese tea production is all non-organic it's sprayed with a lot of pesticides heavily fertilized because people prefer a sweeter taste and a lot of fertilizer induces that sweetness in the tea but if you induce that much sweetness in the tea tea bugs come and so you have to repel the bugs and so it's a vicious circle yeah whereas with non organic teas most of them are not as heavily fertilized and so the books don't really come plus if you just let a bush a bush to grow naturally it receives a lot of natural fragrances and sweetness and also a lot of vigor the the bush becomes more healthy and so when bugs would come to the bush and affect it in a way the bush would be strong enough to resist and that's the strength of what I think natural bush is because if you overfeed bushes with artificial fertilizer and the bugs effect it and it becomes sick that means that that bush is weak whereas a naturally cronin bush is strong and I'd prefer to drink a bush with well a tea with with a strong energy but what I see is as the most important point about organic production is that it's the traditional way chemistry is only something recent during that entire period it's been organic what people drank 100 years ago was organic tea was nothing as sweet as that we know today for the the tea crane I mainly focus on making artisan Japanese he's accessible a lot of producers are doing a great job but they're not accepted by the major tea industry the major tea industry focuses on creating volume and if you create volume if you don't want one pack of tea to taste different than the other pack your your bet bottle should taste the same every time and so what they do is to create cultivars tea bushes clones of tea bushes because cultivars are produced from cuttings and if you take those cuttings and you replant them you get exactly the same bushes it's clone whereas if you plant bushes from seeds they all have their own specifications it's like like breeding children each child that two parents make although the parents are the same are different cuttings making cultivars is taking from cuttings is making clones and they're all the same they all have the same traits and creating tea from that type of cultivar gets you the same flavor and so a lot of cultivars now are created and planted at most of the tea farms throughout Japan and to make things worse is they're all being fertilized to induce a certain type of flavor so you don't really get only the flavor of the tea but you get the flavor that is induced by the fertilisers plus the additional pesticides that there's prey on so that's what the tea industry is doing and that creates consistency that makes it possible for a broader audience to drink tea bead in pet bottle or for those who want from a pack of tea but small artisan tea producers they have like their own field it might be a seed grown native bush or they have specific old of ours that they like to work with but because they're not accepted by the tea industry they have to go and find their own supply route their own customers whereas if you're if you're doing industrial production you just bring it to the tea mark so you are between the cast so I try to be a bridge between both and not in one direction I don't just want to say this producer is cool he makes good tea I want you to drink it now what I also want to do is to get feedback from the people who drank it and bring that information back to the producer so to really create a connection in both ways right I'm immensely happy I love what I'm doing I believe that what I'm doing is valuable I have a beautiful family I have a nice house to live in I I think I found my place which something I came here looking for twelve years ago and I think I did find it so my future is I think just doing more of what I'm doing now

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