Making Art from Reclaimed Wood – Woodturning, Sculpture

Making Art from Reclaimed Wood – Woodturning, Sculpture


I let it dry for a few days, then cut it into squares. OK, so this… Ha! This half is cursed. This half went together just fine on the first
try. I do not know what is going on with this one. I cannot get it to stay together now. I dropped this part and it broke. Alright, I literally held this in place for
five minutes. When I started making this piece, I was not
sure what direction I was going with it. I am still not sure about it, to be honest. I took a poll on Instagram about whether I
should hang it, or whether I should make a base for it. The poll was split exactly 50/50. Who knew the Internet would not be any help? It is made from some reclaimed oak. It used to be an old cabinet or something. One of my neighbours just threw it out. It was already broken up before I got it. There are lots of imperfections in the wood;
dowel holes and things like that. I was not trying to hide the fact that it
is reclaimed. Really when I make these pieces, most of them
are just experiments in trying to make interesting forms and shapes. It is quite interesting to see what pieces
resonate with people. For example, something that I make that I
do not necessarily like how it turned out, someone else might think it is great. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I have been working on an off on this piece
for several weeks. Ultimately, I decided to hang it just to do
something different. Cammie’s Garage is all about trying new things. If you would like to see more interesting
wood projects like this one, make sure you stick around to Cammie’s Garage.

13 thoughts on “Making Art from Reclaimed Wood – Woodturning, Sculpture

  1. I would have voted for it being on a swivel stand. Beautiful work. My sense is that your skills have evolved significantly over the past year.

  2. I like it … mabe hung in backyard in summer , descritly in the trees , very nice pleasing shape to it .

  3. Nice piece, one element i like about it is when you had it hanging and slowly spinning the crossover points of each 'circle' overlapped, so it was difficult to see if the arc continued up to complete the circle above, or fall to continue the circle below. A nice visual trick
    To throw a spanner in the works: I'd suggest hanging it using fishing line and swivel (to make the suspension line and connection point (get rid of that huge hook) as invisible as possible. Make it look like it's floating) above a floor-mounted base (round dark coloured wood?) which contains small LED spotlights pointing up to it, with possibly a small fan hidden in the base that would slowly spin the sculpture. You get to see all sides of the sculpture, plus you get a nice dynamic shadow effect on the ceiling from the spinning sculpture

  4. Hey CG! I love following your channel and have commented a few times. Would you mind walking us through a few things regarding selling pieces? I am afraid to put segmented and "bowl surgery" pieces out there because I am afraid of them failing down the road on the owner. We have seen some of your pieces split after you turn them and they sit around..how do we build the confidence to sell a piece that may or may not make it?

  5. You're so smart in the way you shape and separate those rings, remount them using a board, then cut and glue them up. I like that piece hung up.

  6. Excellent work! I don't know if this might help with failing glue joints but I've heard that putting a thin coat of wood glue on the endgrain surfaces, letting it soak in/dry and then gluing the endgrain to endgrain joint together gives a stronger joint than going at it dry. Failing that I guess there is always epoxy? Mike Peace has a video on endgrain to endgrain gluing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTDvEhGZiJk

  7. Once again a fine piece of art! I must say, it's always interesting at Cammie's Garage. That's why I keep coming back. Cammie, keep the experiments coming!

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