Intercessor Easy Build + Paint Set Paint-A-Long #2 – Painting

Intercessor Easy Build + Paint Set Paint-A-Long #2 – Painting


(upbeat ominous music) Hello and welcome back, Sleepy WhatsIt here and I have another miniatures video for you. In today’s video, we’re going
to be doing the second part of a two-part series of a
walkthrough slash tutorial of painting an Ultramarine
Primaris Intercessor using Games Workshop’s
Intercessor and Paint Set. In the previous video
I detailed the contents of the kits, discussed
the tools that were needed and walked through the
assembling of one of the models. I’m assuming that you
have an assembled version of the sergeant model at this point. I’ll put a card up here
with the previous video and a link down in the description, so that you can go
watch the previous video if you need to get caught up. In this video, we’re
going to be going through the step-by-step walkthrough of the actual painting
process for this model. Now that we have a fully assembled model, we can begin the painting process. Before actually putting
paint on the model though, I’d like to briefly address some of the more technique side of things. Most miniature paints are
supplied in a consistency that is, broadly speaking, too thick for direct application to a model. This is because they are
going to leave brush strokes sitting in the paint or start filling in some of your details if you take them straight out of the pod, so they need to be thinned down with water before we actually start applying them. Thinning with water generally
also has the advantage of making them apply more smoothly. The process for thinning your paints is to first use your brush
to transfer some paint onto your palette, then getting
some water on your brush and transferring it onto the paint, then you need to mix them
together on the palette. If you’re wanting to preserve your brush and extend its life span,
you can use the back end of your brush to actually do the mixing instead of the bristles. The exact amount of water to paint ratio really depends on things
like the age of your paint, local humidity, personal preference and a variety of other factors
that you have to consider. It’s just broadly something
that you’ll have to develop a feel for over time. The target that you’re going for though is paint that’s thin enough
that when you apply it, it applies smoothly without
brush strokes showing, but not so watery that
it starts to flow away from where you’re trying to place it or that you can see the
pigment breaking away from it. The guidance from Duncan of GWs is the famous two thin layers, so you’re, basically, not
expecting to get perfect coverage with your first layer, but the first layer can be easily touched up by applying a second layer of paint after it dries. Another note, before we
actually get into painting, one significant emission of this kit is that there’s a lack of
any type of primer in it. Primer isn’t essential
for painting a model, but because these are game pieces, these figures are going
to be handled a lot and you really should be putting down some primer before painting. This allows the acrylic paint
to better adhere to the model and reduces the chance
of paint rubbing off or chipping off during usage. It also establishes an undercoat color, but we’re doing that using
the Abaddon black anyway. If you already have primer available, I would recommend priming
this mini before proceeding, but it isn’t essential, as I said, especially if you’re painting your first mini, I wouldn’t
recommend going out and getting primer and making the process even more involved at this point. If you want more
information about priming, I have done a video called
A Primer on Priming, which I will put a card up for now. Now that we have a strong understanding of how to thin our paints, we can move on to actually
putting down our first layer of paint according to the instructions. This is going to be a Abaddon black that we’re going to be putting
over the entirety of the model. This layer will be the undercoat for all of our other colored paints, as well as the color for our
black areas on our model. Black is a common undercoat, especially in the Citadel system, since it allows for
establishing of shadows by applying thinner
layers of paint above it and incomplete coverage and later layers doesn’t stick out as noticeably, it just looks like a deeper shadow. White and gray are other
common undercoat colors, white being used for when you
have a lot of bright colors and gray being more of a general purpose if you don’t have a
strong leaning undercoat. The first layer that you put on the model will likely not be a pure black, but still have a little touch of the gray plastic showing through. Once it is dried a little bit,
you can put on a second layer over these thin areas, so
that you should be able to get a nice black coverage over
the entirety of the miniature. You can now pause the video while you go put the
undercoat on your model. Now that you’ve done your undercoating, you should have an
all-black model like this. If you have any plastic
showing through or thin areas, I would really recommend fixing
them up before you proceed. The next paint that we’ll
be applying to our model is Mccrage Blue, which will
be covering all of the armor on our Space Marine. Since we’re not wanting
to be applying blue everywhere to the model,
we’ll need to be a touch more controlled than we were with the black. One way to help with control
is to wipe off excess paint from our brush after loading the paint. You want to have enough on your brush to cover the parts of the bristles that are actually touching the model, but not so much that you
get a glob on your brush. As with all things in painting though, this requires a bit of
experience just to get a feel for the right amount
of paint on your brush. So now on to painting the armor plates. When putting down the blue,
we want to get good coverage for the first layer, we want
to avoid running the paint down into the seams between the paints and all the way out to the edges at times. We want to leave a little bit of black to define where the panels are and where the shadows
would fall on the model. We also want to avoid
getting too much of the blue into areas that are going to be covered with another color later on, just because we’re going to have
to go back and touch them up with the black before we proceed and that’s just time consuming. While putting down the
first layer of paint, you will have probably noticed that some of the black
is still showing through and just generally
darkening the blue color, as opposed to what it
looks like in the pot. While we’re putting down
our second layer of paint, we can lean into this darkening
to allow us to establish some shadows and contrast without having to use
another color of paint. So to do this, you don’t
want the second layer completely covering the
entirety of the first layer, instead, you want to place the
second layer only in areas, where light would be hitting the models, so like on the top of knee
pads and down the legs, but the areas that are shadowed don’t run the second layer
completely out there, so that you’ll have a
differentiation between lighter and darker blues. You should now pause the video and paint all the armor
on your Space Marine. After applying the blue,
you should have a model that looks something like this. If you’ve gone a bit of blue on areas where you didn’t intend to, like I did, you can use the Abaddon black from our undercoat to
touch up your mistakes. You may have also noticed
that I actually missed doing some areas like
the back of the head. So I’ll need to fix that up. I would recommend pausing
the video at this point and going touching up any
areas before proceeding. The next layer that we’ll be painting is the Balthazar gold metallic layer. This paint, for me at least, was relatively thin out of the pot, so I didn’t need to thin it
on the pallet significantly. The areas that we want to paint
gold are the chest emblem, the trim on the shoulders,
the seal on the armor, the little bits on the helmet, the little reliquary on the leg and some of the bits on
the gun, like the scope. Since we’re going to be
painting near the blue that we did before, we’re
going to want to make sure that we wipe off any excess paint to avoid getting a
overspill, though again, if you do get some spillage, you can clean it up after it’s dried. Additionally, when wiping
off the excess paint, you might want to roll
your brush a little bit to re-establish the point. This will just make it a
little bit easier to control where the paint is going. When painting the reliquary, if you just cover the top areas, not going deep down into the crevices, you’ll be able to keep
some of the natural shadows from the black and just generally keep a nice contrast there. I would recommend pausing the video now and painting all the gold metallic areas. Here, you can briefly see
what things look like after painting on the metallic layers. Unfortunately, I didn’t take
better shots of the metallics here, I apologize for that, but the details should be
visible as we do the next layer. The next layer we’ll be basing out will be all of our flesh tones. This will be done using Bugman’s Glow. Again, since we’re working
around previously painted layers, control will be critical, though touch-ups can still be done. In addition to the face,
you’ll be wanting to paint the parchment attached the
purity seal with this paint. I would have preferred to use
something like an off-white or a parchment-y color, but
we don’t have a better option in this kit other than the flesh tone. You can now pause the video while you paint all of
your skin tone areas. This is what my version of the model looks like at this point. We’re now going to be moving on
to placing the texture paste, Armageddon Dust, on the model’s base. Normally, I’d recommend using something like GWs texture tool or
another hard sculpting tool for applying this texture
paste instead of a brush. This is because texture pastes
are very rough on brushes, but we haven’t been
provided with something else and honestly, this brush
isn’t super high quality to begin with. The process I go through
for applying texture paste is I first put a large glob, non-thinned, onto an open area of the base and then I spread it around, specifically pushing the paste when it gets close to the model. This is because the paste
tends to be very sticky and difficult to remove from
areas once it touches it, so we want to avoid
accidentally touching anything with the paste and I find
that I have a little bit more control when I’m pushing
versus stroking with the paste, so I will stroke to spread it out, but when I get near the feet and such, you’ll see that I’m
pushing with the brush. You can now pause the video and go apply the texture
paste to your own model. The texture paste will
take a bit of time to dry on the order of 15 minutes. This is what my model looks
like after letting the paste dry and then touching up the
rim of the base a bit. Before proceeding to the next step, we need to make sure two things. First, we should perform all
of the touch-ups that we need, since the next step is
going to make touching up the paint difficult. Additionally, we need to
make sure that the paint is completely dried at this point because, otherwise, we’re
going to start risking paints blending together in
unintentional fashions. The next stage in the process is to apply Agrax Earthshade as a shade to the model to deepen the shadows and define some of the details. We’re going to be applying
this to the flesh tone areas of the model, the metallic
areas and the texture paste. I personally did not shade
the blue and the black areas. The black areas are not
going to show significant amount of shading anyway
and the blue areas if we’ve been careful while
applying our two layers, should already have some
sort of shading defined and I find the Umber tone of Agrax to make the blue a
little bit dirty looking. So when applying the shade to the model you want to apply it relatively
liberally to the areas that you’re applying it to, so they can flow into the details. Though if it does pool in any areas, you’re on going to want
to empty out your brush and use that to wick away the excess. You want to get rid of these pools because they’ll cause
tide marks when drying. As with the texture paste, this shade is going to take
a significant amount of time to dry, so often if you’re
doing batch painting of models, this is where you’d be doing basing colors and blocking them out for other models while letting this dry. Now, you can pause the video and go apply shade to your model. This is what my model looks like once we have let all the shading dry. Following the instructions on the box, we are technically done at this point. For our first model, I think this is a perfectly fine place to stop, but given what we’ve
been given in the kit, I think we can push this
just a little bit further and make it look a little bit nicer. Specifically, what we’re going to be doing is a bit of highlighting
to brighten up the areas that we just shaded. This may seem a bit counterintuitive since we just darkened these areas, when highlighting though, we
just want to be putting paint on the highest points
of them to accent them and to establish more of a contrast, so that the range from the brightest point to the darkest point in a color is wider than it currently is since we’ve darkened everything down. The two colors that we’ll be highlighting are the flesh tone, Bugman’s Glow and the Balthazar gold metallic areas. We won’t be touching the
Armageddon Dust texture paste on the base since we don’t
really have a good matte standard paint to do any highlighting with and texture paste is
not a really good paint for doing highlighting. For the face, we’ll be
applying a small amount of Bugman’s Glow to areas
like the top of the ears, the cheekbones, the brow and the nose. Basically, lightly touching
the raised areas of the face so they pop out relative
to the shaded areas. Now you can pause the video
and go highlight the face. The other color that we’re highlighting is the metallic gold, so
we’ll be using Balthazar gold for our highlighting. For these areas, we’re going to be wanting to touch the tops of the shoulder trim, the gun components, the top
edge to the chest emblems and the reliquary. We don’t need or want to touch areas that are on the underside of the figures, like the bottom edge of things
don’t need to be highlighted since that doesn’t really make sense. Now, you can pause the video and go highlight your metallics. So this is what my
completed model looks like after doing some highlighting. It isn’t going to win any Golden Demons, but I’d be happy putting
this out on a table and playing a game. Now, we’ll have the obligatory
narcissistic showcase shot of our model here. After completing this
model, I would suggest completing the other
two models in the kit, even if you’re not planning
on using them in games. This is because a large part
of the hobby requires skills, like brush control and paint consistency that just requires repetition to actually build up the
experience and the skill itself. For next steps after these models, there are other related kits in this line, like Plague Marines,
Stormcast and Nighthaunt if you’re looking at doing
a wider variety GW models. If you’re really gung-ho
about playing Ultramarines, there are a number of box
sets that you could dive into. I can’t really recommend which
is a the best one for you ’cause I don’t actually play Ultramarines. I would talk to some people at your friendly local game store and see what they would
recommend, for next steps if you’re trying to build a
competitive, playable army of Space Marines. If you’re interested in other
painting styles and systems, I do know that Reaper has a couple of good learn to paint kits
that some point in the future I’m going to be doing some videos about, but I will put a link
down on the Reaper Store so you can see what those look like if you’re interested in them. If you’re looking for decent,
cheap minis to practice on, many game stores sell WizKids, various lines of pre-primed minis, which are a good starting point, especially for fantasy character. Reaper has its Bones line, which is another favorite of mine, that are affordable and good
quality minis to work with. Well, I hope this video
has been helpful for you beginning your hobbying journey. If it has, please consider
liking, subscribing, sharing, doing all those things
that makes YouTube happy. Otherwise, I look forward to
seeing you in the next video. (upbeat ominous music)

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