How to Organize Your Drawers + DIY Drawer Dividers!

How to Organize Your Drawers + DIY Drawer Dividers!


– Hello everybody, my
name is Jennifer Maker. Today I’m going to show you
how to organize your drawers and make your own drawer dividers, on the Great Maker show and tell. (upbeat music) So, ever since I joined the
Get Organized HQ Summit, I have been so inspired
and motivated to organize. After I cleaned and organized my entire craft room last week, I tackled my disorganized, messy drawers. I had one drawer, in particular,
that I used all the time and it had become,
essentially, a junk drawer, if you know what I mean. And there’s another drawer
that was a jumbled mess of cords and power supplies. So everything looked
good when it was closed, but as soon as you opened it up, it was like a
Jack-in-the-box, it was crazy. I needed to organize these drawers and I want to show you how you can do it quickly and easily, too. The biggest issue, I think,
with my disorganized drawers, is that there is no internal organization. And part of the reason for this is that these particular
drawers that I really like, and many of us do as well,
are the Alex Ikea drawers, and they have a really low profile, and many drawer dividers don’t fit inside. Or when they do, they
are just way too pricey. So to tackle my organizational issues, I have designed my own drawer dividers that I can mix and match to fit
perfectly inside my drawers. You can make these too, and they will fit in nearly any drawer, thanks to the way that I designed them. Now, to organize your
drawers, all you really need is some paper and a pencil,
which we’re going to use to map out your drawers itself. Don’t worry, it’s not scary at all. Plus, some card stock
or light craft board, and some glue to make the
drawer dividers themselves. You can cut out the
drawer dividers by hand using trusty scissors, or you
could use the cutting machine, like the Cricut, like I did. You may also want a
label maker for labeling your drawer contents, but
you can also just use a pen. No big deal. So let me show you how
to organize your drawers, and use these awesome drawer dividers. Now be sure to stay tuned,
because I have to tell you about this super cool organization summit that I’ve been invited to speak at. It’s free, you don’t have
to go anywhere to watch it, you can just stay home,
watch it on your phone or on your computer, and
you won’t want to miss it because it’s going to help
you get organized too. The first step to organized
drawers is to purge. Take everything out of your
drawer and spread it out on a flat surface nearby. Discard or recycle any
trash, anything outdated, anything broken, anything you
haven’t used in six months and truly don’t expect to use soon, and anything you no longer want. It’s important to get
rid of these things now. Once your drawer is empty,
give it a good wipe down. This is the perfect time to clean it and make it fresh again. The next step is to assess. Decide what remains
and what belongs where. Looking at what’s left for your drawer, decide what’s going to
go back into this drawer, and what needs to go elsewhere. Be sure to group like things together so you know how much
you have of each thing and have a general idea
of whether it even belongs in this drawer or not. Remove items that should go
elsewhere so you have only the new drawer contents remaining. So, I had weird things
like spoons and clamps and some tools that definitely
belonged in other places like over on my giant pegboard. The next step is to contain. So you want to find or
make compartments for items that you plan to put back in your drawer. I recommend you take a piece of paper, and cut it to the same size
as the bottom of your drawer. If you need to tape several
pieces together, that’s fine. And then place it into the
bottom of your empty drawer. Place the drawer items on the paper in the order and arrangement you prefer. Be sure to place items that you use frequently near the front. Now draw straight lines around the items. Remove the items and the
paper, be sure you make a note of what went where, on your paper. Match the sizes of squares on the paper to my DIY drawer dividers,
that I’m going to show you how to make a little later in this video. Then make as many dividers as you need. Place your drawer
dividers into your drawer and put all of your items into
the appropriate compartment based on the paper map that you drew. The last step to organizing
your drawers is to tag. So you want to label each
compartment in your drawer with the thing that’s
supposed to go into it, so when it’s empty, you
know to go looking for it, or when you have more of that
item, you know where it goes. Either write the name
of the item on the tag or use a label maker, or even
just write with your Cricut, it’s entirely up to you. This, by the way, is my
P.A.C.T. Organization System, P-A-C-T, p for purge, a
for assess, c for contain and t for tag, I like to
think of it as making a pact with myself to stay tidy and organized. So, would you like to make
your own drawer dividers? Let me show you how to make them. First, you need to get my
drawer divider box patterns. You can download them from from my blog at jennifermaker.com/drawers. They are available as
PDF, DXF, and SVG format. You can cut these dividers
by hand with scissors or with a cutting machine like a Cricut. There are five different files, which are the different
sizes, A, B, C, D and E. A is the smallest and E is the largest. If you use a cutting machine like I did, just upload your file
to your design software. Let me show you how to do that in Cricut design space in this tutorial. Now, don’t forget, design software updates and changes over time, if anything about what I’m about to show
you in the design software seems outdated or
different than what you see on your screen, I’ve likely
already discovered this and made updates for you. You can always check
by opening a new window and going to jennifermaker.com/updates. Videos are sorted by date. If there have been any updates
to how the design software I show in this video works
for this particular project, or if there have been any
changes in how you do it, it will be listed here. First, go to Cricut design
space, click on New Project, then click on Upload,
then click Upload Image, then click Browse. Locate the SVG files inside
the decompressed ZIP files that you already downloaded. Once they are uploaded,
select the file, and click Insert Images to add them to your canvas. Now if you want to score
these drawer dividers, it’s essential that you
set the score lines. Each drawer divider has two
layers, a score line layer and a solid cut layer. You need to locate the score
line layer and change it from its default of cut to
score in the Line Type Menu up at the top of the window. Then select both the Score
layer and the Cut layer and click Attach at the
bottom of the window so the divider itself is scored. If you don’t do this, it’s
not going to work right. When that’s done, go
ahead and click Make It in the upper right corner, then confirm that your design is set
to both score and cut, over on the left. If it looks good, click
Continue, wait for your machine to connect, then choose your material. I select Medium Cardstock for my 80-pound cardstock dividers. I also like to set the pressure to More, to ensure a good, clean cut. For this project, we’re going
to need some tacky glue. I do not recommend a tape
runner, as it probably won’t be strong enough
to hold the box together. You may also want to use a scoring stylus or scoring wheel, either will work. For paper, I’m using
this 80-pound cardstock which has different colors on either side, ’cause I think it looks super cute. And for the two largest drawer dividers, you’re going to need to use 12 by 24 inch, long cardstock like this. You can also use craft board
if you want a stronger box. I also recommend you use the
blue light-grip cutting mat when you’re cutting the
cardstock, it makes weeding much easier because it doesn’t
stick so much to the mat. So we just place our
cardstock on the cutting mat, then load the mat into
our Cricut, and let it do all the hard cutting work,
and don’t forget to put your scoring stylus or scoring wheel into your Cricut before you cut. When you remove your cardstock
from your cutting mat, be sure to flip your cutting mat over and peel the mat away from the paper, instead of the other way around,
to avoid curling the paper. Go slowly so you don’t rip your paper. Now it’s time to fold
your drawer dividers. Place your paper with the side you want to appear inside the box,
face up on your surface. So here is a size A divider box, with a darker green side up. Fold your divider along the fold lines that are scored into it. There are a total of 10 score lines, so you’ll need to make 10 folds, you should fold them all
inward to start with. Now flip your cardstock
over to the other side, and fold in the four flaps
at the four outer edges, so they’re folded in
the opposite direction, just as I’m doing here. Now it’s time to glue. Flip your folded box back over
and begin gluing the sides. If you’re not sure what sides to glue on, try folding the box
together so you can see how it all assembles when it’s done. And know that the wings go on the outside of the box, not the inside. I recommend you glue two
sets of side wings at a time, just as I’m doing here. Once you have the glue on your side wings, press down firmly and allow
time for the glue to take hold, which is maybe about 30 seconds. Turn the drawer divider box over, and glue the other side wings now. And then when that’s all
done, glue all four side flaps to reinforce the top edges and strengthen your drawer divider. And there we go, the drawer
divider is now all assembled. Here’s a quick look at the
other four drawer divider boxes, so you can see how they go together too. So this here is the B-size box. And you fold it and
glue it and assemble it exactly the same way
that you do the A-size, it’s just a little bit
longer, there’s no difference other than that, but it
goes together pretty well, and fits really nicely
next to two A-size boxes. This blue one here is a
C-size box, and that’s the one that’s roughly a square, so
it’s our medium size box. It goes together the same
way, there’s no difference, it’s just a little bit bigger. You’ll probably end up
using this box a lot, because it holds quite a bit. And again it all fits together
great with the other two. Now, for sizes D and
E, you’re going to need to use bigger paper because
they’re a lot longer, in order to fit into those long drawers that are difficult to reach in the back, again because they don’t
pull out all the way, so that’s what these boxes are for. They’re also really great
for things like pens and other long things, scissors,
rulers, that sort of thing. So you can get this
longer paper off of Amazon and from Cricut, and they sell
it at the craft stores too. If you can’t find this
longer paper, you could try just doing two pieces
of regular-sized paper and then tape them together afterwards, but you’d probably want to
add, like an additional bottom, just to keep everything stable. But really, this longer paper
isn’t difficult to find, and it assembles in exactly the same way. It’s just a little bit longer. And this here is the
Size-E divider drawer box. And it takes almost an entire
sheet of 12 by 24 inch paper. But it makes a giant box that
is perfect for putting in the back of your drawers so
that you can put bigger things, and also so that it’s easier to reach, since those drawers don’t
really pull out all they way. But otherwise, it assembles the same way, it’s just a different size. And here are all of our boxes, and let’s put them into
one possible configuration, and you’ll see how well they fit together. Pretty awesome, huh? I am just in love with these drawer divider boxes, aren’t you? And there we go, beautifully
organized drawers that are a pleasure to use. Just opening these drawers now makes me feel all happy inside. And it’s so much easier
to keep a drawer tidy when you have dividers. It prevents you from just tossing stuff in without regard to whether it
actually belongs there or not. Right, yeah, so now,
after cutting and gluing, like my 20th drawer
divider, I thought of a way to design these drawer dividers
so they don’t need any glue. Just tabs and slots. If you want this alternate version, you can have it for free, of course. Get the details on where
to find my no-glue version over on my blog at
jennifermaker.com/drawers. It’s awesome! Being organized feels so
good, and if you’re looking for more ways to get organized, too, don’t forget about the free
Get Organized HQ Summit with 40 organization experts
to help you get organized. Including yours truly, I have a session on how to organize craft supplies, does that surprise you at all? So, I know thousands of
you from my community have already signed up
for it, which is amazing, but I don’t want anyone to miss out on it, as it’s coming up really soon. And remember, it’s free, so
you’ve got nothing to lose and everything to gain. It is so motivating, I mean, just look at all the organization that it’s gotten me to do
in the last couple of weeks. I will put the signup
link and a description for this video below, or you can just go to jennifermaker.com/getorganizedhq. That’s it for today,
remember, if you can tell me what you want to make, or organize, I can show you how to do it. Until next time, this is Jennifer Maker reminding you to craft a life you love. (gentle music)

29 thoughts on “How to Organize Your Drawers + DIY Drawer Dividers!

  1. Thank you for sharing this! How cool is that?! By the way, Where can I find that aqua mat? I love it!πŸ’•πŸ’•πŸ’•

  2. Jennifer, I can't figure out how to get the patterns for drawer organizers.Β  Help.Β  I have the PW to your resource library and I still can't find the free patterns.

  3. Thank you for this fantastic tutorial and designs to go with it! I need this level of organisation in my life, my craft room looks like a scene from one of those hidden object games – you have inspired me to sort it out πŸ˜Žβ™ 

  4. Thank you Jennifer, these will be so handy! I love ideas like this that we can make on our MAKER ! I was wondering if you have ever made one of those things that hang on a chair arm or the side of your bed to hold pens, pencils, notepads, etc?

  5. Hi Jennifer
    I organised my draws the other day, I brought my draw organisers for home bargains in the uk and I love them.
    This will come in handy if I need more thanks for sharing.
    πŸ€—πŸ˜πŸ’–πŸ“ΈπŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»

  6. How do I make these boxes for deep drawers? How else I could organize deep drawers? I can use these for the shallow drawers. I have Iris carts that I gathered and put all together ln a large closet on 2 levels. I had these allover the house and they filled the closet. No cost re-purposing!

  7. Wow, this organization system is so 'doable' (if that's a word, lol!). Thanks for sharing projects that are so useful and needed!!

  8. I have some new drawers in my craft room and will probably need some dividers like this, thanks so much for sharing the pattern. I'll have to check out that organizational seminar too.

  9. I love πŸ’• that you put the tab for labels!!!! πŸ’ƒπŸΌ I really like assigning a place for things. I am much more likely to return to designated places!!! TFS

  10. Your tutorials are amazing and so helpful. I have learned so much from you and wish I was as creative as you are. Thank you for taking time out of your busy day to make these videos and post free SVGs for those of us (myself included) who do not know how to make them. Congratulations on speaking at the organization group, I am looking forward to watching it. I have used some of the tools already but must be honest I need to get better at the purging of stuff..So thank you again.

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