How to Draw the Millennium Falcon | Let’s Draw Star Wars

How to Draw the Millennium Falcon | Let’s Draw Star Wars


[BEEPING] [MUSIC PLAYING] [SPACESHIP MOTOR] [MUSIC PLAYING] – Hello everyone, and welcome
to Let’s Draw “Star Wars.” I’m R Trooper Eric. And here to help me, as always,
is our friendly R Droid, R3A3. R3, I’ll give you three
guesses as to why I’m so happy. [ROBOT CHIRPING] No, that would make you happy. But humans don’t take oil baths. [ROBOT CHIRPING] Water, of course. [ROBOT CHIRPING] OK, relax. I’ll just tell you. Today, we’re learning
how to draw my hands-down favorite ship of all time– the Millennium Falcon. The ship that made the Kessel
Run in under 12 parsecs. And it helped destroy, not
one, but two death stars. [EXPLOSION] – Yeh, ha. – Yeah. – I used to dream about flying
the Falcon when I was a kid, sitting next to Chewbacca
in the pilot’s seat, blasting TIE fighters
with Han Solo– pew, pew, pew, pew– jumping at light speed
just in the nick of time. Anyways, are you
ready to get started? [ROBOT CHIRPING] Great. Stick around to the end
to see R3’s drawing. If you’re ready, then punch it. [STRANGE NOISES] Don’t worry, I got this. [EXPLOSION] The Millennium Falcon may look
like an old, worn out hunk of junk and sometimes
act like one with her temperamental hyperdrive. But beneath her blast
scarred exterior, she’s full of surprises. The Falcon is death and
maneuverable, dodging asteroids and outsmarting TIE
fighters and has played a role in some of
the greatest victories of the rebel alliance. I’ve said it before. I’ll say it again. Reference is key. I’ve got a reference here
of the Millennium Falcon. This is a shot taken of a model
and was taken at Skywalker Ranch at our archives. Now, this might
look intimidating. But we’re going to break it
down into six easy steps. The Falcon, overall,
is an oval-shaped with a couple of prongs
sticking out the front. And there’s kind of a tapered
cylinder for the cockpit– everything you already
know how to draw. All of the little details
are really not important. But we’re just going to hit
some key landmarks shapes. And that will give us a
perfect Millennium Falcon. For step one, we’re going
to draw the initial body shape as an oval. And then we’re going to figure
out where the center point is. And then we’re not
going to use it, because the top of the Falcon
rises up from the edges. So we’re going to draw the
oval for the middle off center. Step two is really easy. We’re just going to add some
indication of dimension. Now, the Falcon
has a lot of parts. And so I broke it down into
more steps so it’s easier for us to move along. For step three, we’re going to
rough in the plainer shapes– the front prongs, the
centerpiece, and the two pieces going off to the side. For step four, we’re
going to add dimension to the planar shapes
we did in step three and also add little
details, like the round caps at the end of the panels. For step five, we’re going
to work on the cockpit. Because it comes
at an off angle, and it’s a little bit different
than the rest of the ship, I made it an olive tone. For step six, we’re going to
add those landmark details that really make it look
like the Falcon– the satellite dish, the
vents over the engine, the windows in the cockpit. And finally, we’re going
to finish up the drawing by going over it
with a dark pencil, picking and choosing which
lines we want to keep and which lines
we want to ignore. First, I’m going to
draw a nice big oval. I’m going to find
the center by drawing two perpendicular lines. I’m just eyeballing what looks
like it’s about the middle. And then I’m not going
to use the center. I’m going to draw
another oval off center– a little bit back and a little
bit over to the left side to lift the top of the Falcon. Now, for step two, we’re just
going to drop our oval down to add some dimension. Now, for step three, I’m going
to add in some of these planar shapes, the center panel. Center panel tapers a little
bit at the tip very slightly. And now the side panels. They’re going to have
cylindrical shapes coming out of the end. But we’ll do those later. [MUSIC PLAYING] The front prongs– when we’re
bringing it back to the oval, we’re just going to
draw a diagonal line. And the diagonal line here
should come back to meet the curve of the main body. [MUSIC PLAYING] Now, for step four, we’re
going to take the planar shapes we just drew and extrude them. The side panels have
a curved profile, because it follows the curve
of the top of the ship. Now, you can easily see how the
center of the top of the Falcon is higher than the edges. [MUSIC PLAYING] The center part has
not very thick– but it has another
disconnected panel underneath. And then we add cylindrical
shapes at the end. [MUSIC PLAYING] We’re going to flesh out
a little bit of the detail on the corner here
that’s exposed where the central panel and
cylinder are cutting into the main body of the ship. Step five is all
about the cockpit. We’re going to draw a line here. We’re going to draw a
curved line that meets right with the oval of the main body. And now we’re going
to draw two circles– once semicircle and make the
tapered cylindrical cockpit. [MUSIC PLAYING] Step six– we’re going to
add landmarks to really bring out the look of the Falcon. There are sunken panel. These blockish shapes here
might not be real landmarks. But I like them
because they look like they’re attaching
the front prongs to the main body of the ship. This is the satellite dish. [MUSIC PLAYING] The engine vents in the back. The first three are
very close together. The next three
are further apart. The engine area actually
sticks out a little bit further than the main body. And we’re going to follow the
curve of the back of the ship but extending it making
it a little bit bigger. There’s four pylons that
stick up back there too. [MUSIC PLAYING] And then there are a few
other openings on the ship just to give it a
little more detail. And let’s get in
the window detail– going to have to
look at the reference here closely, because
the Falcon windows have a very specific shape. [MUSIC PLAYING] Millennium Falcon is
by far my favorite ship in the “Star Wars” universe. Well, my favorite
ship in any universe. It’s kind of funny, because
it’s a very funny-looking ship. Let’s face it. But that’s what’s
so great about it. It’s not sleek. It’s not very stylish. Yet, it’s amazing. Let’s add the gun on the top. First, an oval. Then we’ll extrude a cube. [MUSIC PLAYING] We’ll use cylinders for
the barrels for those. [MUSIC PLAYING] Now, we’re going
to go in and ink it keeping the lines we want
and ignoring the lines we don’t. [BEATING] [MUSIC PLAYING] I’m using a brush pen, because
I like how I can get thick lines are pressing down pretty
hard and thin lines by not pressing down
very hard at all. This prong is a little
too close to the center. I’m not going to follow
my construction line. I’m still going to use my
construction line as a guide. But I’m going to
draw next to it. And it’ll still help me
draw my lines straight and in the right direction just
not necessarily the same place. [MUSIC PLAYING] The lines on the Falcon
aren’t usually straight. So I’m going to go ahead and
add little nooks and crannies and line variations
here and there. Doing the Kessel
Run in 12 parsecs certainly gives you
bragging rights. But it’s not great
for your paint job. [MUSIC PLAYING] I’m going to shade
in a little bit here just to give the
impression of window panel. [MUSIC PLAYING] Feel free to go back
to the reference photo and just add as many
details as you like. I’m keeping this minimalistic– going to shade in these
recessed areas here just to add some depth. The engine vents
are actually raised up from the body of the ship. I didn’t do construction
lines for them because sometimes, I get lazy. It’s a little detail that I
feel like I can add on my own just with the final ink. It’s nice to have that
round satellite dish again. I saw it in the trailer for
“The Rise of Skywalker,” Lando flying the
ship one more time. Our reference has
holes in these areas. I didn’t draw them in with
my construction lines. But that doesn’t mean I
can’t add them in now. [MUSIC PLAYING] And that is my
Millennium Falcon. OK, everyone. R3 is finished with his drawing. Who wants to see it? [ROBOT TALKING] Well, I guess it
looks like the Falcon didn’t quite get out of that
asteroid field in Empire. And that’s it for
today’s lesson. Did you learn something new? Let us know in the comments. Thanks for watching. I’m R Trooper Eric. This is R3. And may the force be with you. [MUSIC PLAYING]

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