Esperanza Cortés, BRICworkspace Artist, Explores the Colombian Emerald Industry | BK Stories

Esperanza Cortés, BRICworkspace Artist, Explores the Colombian Emerald Industry | BK Stories



I'm a multidisciplinary artist I work in a lot of different mediums I do a variety I've been doing a lot of drawing I've been doing sculptures and some jewelry based work also I have been in the United States since I was three and a half I was born in Colombia well my work is influenced by colonial history and it takes different lots of different forms because I'm also looking at nature and then cultural information these countries that I've always had power literally consume other societies for their game they become more splendorous and more beautiful because of that please come in I started to work with this idea of Mo because in Colombia the the creation story involves two gods who then later on turn into mountains that are emerald it's called emerald tears because of the beauty of these objects when the colonizers arrived they changed the entire history of Colombia then this chair that I've been working on for a while also has a lot of the green like an emerald I think it's harder than for the countries to keep its control over its own resources as we see in Africa with blood diamonds it's going on via with the animals Brazil with the gold this image to me you know the wing is an image of freedom of flight but this is extremely way down and burdened with all the change you know the chains are linking to historical facts to the to the jewelry making process through the connection to the jewelry industry which still is subjugated people it might not be the way it was a couple of centuries three or four centuries ago but it is still happening in many parts of the world where people are subjugated terribly all chains are made by hand so whether it's silver or gold someone is making every single chain so we're at ground-floor gallery where I am participating in a group show this is the corpse flower this is also another corpse flower and that this is that large carnivorous flower that grows in Borneo and for me you know the carnivorous flower is very similar to colonial powers I know people think colonialism and but I don't really think so I think it continued with global banking this is an image of uranium and the one in the window is an image of a Mohs I'm talking about these ideas these natural resources that have helped to how can I say enrich conflict because uranium changed the course of history forever and the way that we see warfare I use some small pieces of broken glass in the piece it's ink watercolor and gouache and just like with uranium Columbia has been affected greatly by the power and the draw of emeralds because it's the it has helped to pave the way for people to continue the civil conflict I mean it's like so exciting to be part of the bridge residency this is an amazingly wonderful challenge and I'm going to be pushing my work much further because it's the comfort of being around other artists this is a small community of artists wonderful to have exchanges conversations about our ideas you

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