Drawing with the Pen tool, Pencil tool & Brush tool Ep10/19 [Adobe Illustrator for Beginners]

Drawing with the Pen tool, Pencil tool & Brush tool Ep10/19 [Adobe Illustrator for Beginners]


[ Music ]>>Hello and welcome to
this video tutorial brought to you by tastytuts.com. In this video we’re
going to be focusing on drawing in Adobe Illustrator. In Illustrator there are a
range of tools to help you draw. It really comes down to
what you’re trying to draw because some tools are better
equipped for various situations. So in this video we are going
to be covering the drawing tools and along the way I’ll be
demonstrating some techniques so you can get a
good understanding of the possibilities
you have in this program and what tools you may want
to use for any given task. Now, the best way to learn
is by watching and doing. So to help you practice with
the drawing tools I have created this worksheet. We are going to be
using this worksheet to trace some shapes I
have prepared earlier. By the end of this video you
will have a good understanding of how to use the drawing tools, which you can use to
produce your work. So to follow along with
this tutorial you will need to open this document. This can be found in the
“essentials practice” folder in the “project” folder. Now, you can download this
“project” folder for free. The download link is
in the description. So with the “project” folder
open click “essential practice,” “drawing”, “versions,”
and select the version of Illustrator you’re using
— in my case it’s “CC” — and open the “drawing” file. And you should have something
that looks like this. Along the way I will be
mentioning some useful shortcut keys which you can
find in the description and in the shortcut key
page in the project pdf, which you can also
download in the description. Now, we are going to be
covering a lot in this video, and in quite some depth. If you wish to skip ahead at
any point in the video, or back, you can do so quite simply. The topics covered in
this video are listed in the description
along with their times. So be sure to check that out. Okay, so once you have this
document open let’s get into it. So I want to draw your
attention to the first page and if you zoom in here you can
see we have four shape objects. These are some of the
shapes we are going to be creating later
on, but before we do that we are just going
to take a closer look. So the first thing I want
you to do is activate the “direct selection” tool. You can do this by
pressing A on the keyboard and you will notice your mouse
cursor change to a white arrow. Then I want you to
click and drag an area over the four shapes like so. Upon release we can now
see the vector outlines and the anchor points and
handles that make up each shape. Next I want you to press Z on
the keyboard and zoom in like so on the first shape. So here we have a simple stroke. This was created using the pen
tool and we can see it consists of five anchor points. Next we have a blob shape. This shape was created
using the pen tool. We can see here we have
a very precise placement of anchor points along
the vector outline. This vector shape does
not have any hard corners and if we look closely we can
see how the handles behave to create the curves. We can see that on some of the rounder curves
we have longer handles. If we come down to the next
vector shape we have a letter R vector. This was also created
using the pen tool. Notice how the anchor points on the curves are positioned
to create this shape. Notice how the anchor
points have been positioned to create these subtle curves. Now the last shape is a little
different from the others. Looking at this example we can
see a lot more anchor points. This example was created
using the pencil tool. What you will learn later is that the pencil tool
draws freely. So Illustrator generates
more complex anchor points to create the vector line. Also we have a different
stroke applied, which gives it that illustrated look. We will be looking how to achieve this a little
later on in this tutorial. Okay, so now we are
familiar with vector paths, anchor points, and handles. Let’s start to draw some shapes. So let’s come down to the second
art board and start at the top. The first tool we are going
to use is the pen tool. Now the pen tool is probably one of the most popular drawing
tools in Illustrator. You can find the pen
tool over in the menu, about five icons down. You will also notice
a little white arrow in the bottom right
corner of the pen tool. If we click and hold on the pen
tool button you will see a box expands to reveal the
series of pen tools. Now, we are going to use all of these pen tools
in this tutorial. So to make it easy I’m going
to move my mouse cursor over the little arrow
to the right and upon release we will
snap off an independent pen tool panel. We are going to be referring
to this as we go along. Okay, so at any point we
can activate the pen tool by simply pressing
P on the keyboard. When the pen tool is active you
will notice the mouse cursor change shape and we have
this little fountain pen. This means we are
ready to begin to draw. So let’s start with the first
example here and let’s begin to click some points
down along the worksheet. So in the simpler sense
we use the pen tool to click and drop down points. As we click and drop down these
points we begin to draw a line. So I’m just going to drop five
points here along my first worksheet shape and we have just
created a simple line stroke. Now, at any point look
carefully in the “tools” menu at the color square
at the bottom. Notice, on this occasion we
have a transparent fill color and we know this because
there is a red dash through it and a black stroke. If I press the “swap fill”
button you will see the effect that has on the shape. So I will press this again to
go back to my original state. Now, by default when you use
the pen tool the fill color is normally set to transparent
and the stroke color is black, but sometimes this
may not be the case. For example, if you’ve
been drawing shapes and changing colors your stroke and fill will not be
set to the default. I am just going to delete
the line I just made, change the fill color to red, and change the stroke
color to yellow. If I press P to activate
my pen tool and draw my line
again we can see here that when we draw
the stroke a fill and stroke color is applied. So you have to be careful when using the pen
tool in Illustrator. You need to pay attention to your color fill
and stroke colors. So I’m going to set
this back to default. I can do this easy by
coming over to the menu, clicking on the “default”
fill and stroke button. That is going to change my
colors back to black and white. Then I’m going to
select my “fill” square and just click the transparent
red dash button below like so. And now my stroke is back
to just a stroke fill. Excellent. Now, if I press V
of the keyboard to activate the selection tool
we can now see the vector bound in box around it and we
can use this bound in box to move the stroke around, rotate or quickly
change the size, like so. I’m just going to undo that
and move onto the next shape. So by pressing P I’m going
to activate my pen tool again and this time draw a
different shape and I’m going to start from the top here. So the pen tool allows
us to click and drop points freely
on the canvas area. And I’m just going
to press undo here. Though if you’re looking to
draw a straight line however, with the pen tool active,
if we press and hold “shift” on the keyboard I can
move my mouse cursor above and when I click a
straight line will be drawn. I’ll just undo that. This can be done to
the left, to the right, top, or bottom like so. Now this can also be done to create a perfect
line in 45 degrees too. For example, if I press and hold
“shift” again and come over, but this time in
a slight diagonal, and click this will create
a line to 45 degrees. So I’m going to continue to
draw my shape here, pressing and holding “shift” to create
a diagonal line up, across, and to the left,
and up once again. So before we finish our
shape I just want to press V to activate the selection tool. And again we can see the
bound in box around it. This time I’m going to click
“off” to deselect my object. So as you can see this is
currently a line stroke, just like my first example
to the left, but now I want to create the full shape. So I’m going to press
P on the keyboard to activate the pen tool,
then move my mouse cursor just over the end of the
stroke like so. As you do this you will
notice the mouse cursor change and we get a little line appear. This is Illustrator asking
us; do we want to click that part of the line? So upon click we have
clicked that part of the line and we are now ready to continue
to draw and expand that line. So I could continue to draw
the stroke in any direction, like so, but on this occasion
I’m not going to do that. I’m going to do the following. With my pen tool I’m carefully
going to place my mouse cursor over the starting
point of my line and as I do this you will
notice the mouse cursor change with a little zero shape. Now this is Illustrator
asking us; do we want to connect
this line together? So I’m going to go
ahead and click. Now this is no longer a stroke. When you join your stroke line in this way you create
a vector shape. So we drop down some
points to create a stroke and by joining the
stroke we created a shape. Excellent. But what if, for example, we
draw a shape, but then choose to edit the shape further? Well, to make some basic
changes by pressing A on the keyboard we can activate
the direct selection tool. This will allow us to select
anchor points on the line. And if I want to I can
move an anchor point to change the shape like so. Though what if I want
to add to the shape? Perhaps create a
new corner point? Well, using the pen tool
we can add more points to the vector line. So let’s take a look at this. If we come back to the “pen tool” menu the next
tool along is called the “add anchor point” tool. And here we can see a little
plus symbol next to it. Now, if we select this we will
notice our mouse pointer remains the same, but now we have a
little plus symbol next to it. So with this “add anchor point”
tool selected we can carefully come over to the line, place
your mouse cursor over the line, and remember we need to have
the line selected before we add a point. If you place the cursor over
the selected line just right and click you will
add a new anchor point to the line like so. And we can now see the anchor
point sitting on the line. Now if I want to I can use
the arrow keys on the keyboard to move this around, like so. Or, if I want to have more
control, I can press A on the keyboard to activate
the “direct selection” tool, click on the anchor point,
and move into a new position. So that is how you can add
anchor points to a vector line. Next I want to remove
an anchor point. So if I come up to the
“pen tool” menu tab, this time I’m going to select
the “delete anchor point” tool. Then you will see a little
minus symbol on the cursor. So with the “delete anchor
point” tool selected I’m going to choose an anchor point on my
line and carefully put my cursor over it and click once. If you successfully put your
mouse cursor over the anchor and click you will notice
the anchor point is removed and the stroke and
shape changes like so. So that’s how you can create and modify basic shapes
using the pen tool and direct selection tool. In the next example we’re
going to look at how to create curves
using the pen tool. So here we have a shape, which we are going
to attempt to trace. Now, since this is our first
attempt I have placed some of these guides here
to help you. Now the trick to
efficient tracing is to try and use the least amount of
anchor points as you can. When tracing a shape you will
have to use some judgement and try to anticipate where you
are going to need anchor points to create an accurate curve. Now, I have these guides here
to help us as an example, but if you are tracing your own
drawing you will not have these. For this example I’m going to demonstrate two techniques
you can use; the click and drag technique and the
click and convert technique. So see which one you like. The first technique I’m going to demonstrate is the
click and drag technique. So I’m going to press P
to activate my pen tool, come to my first point,
and click and drag like so. Upon dragging I will
create some anchor handles. In this instance I’m going
to press and hold “shift” to get the handles nice and straight along my worksheet
example, then I’m going to come to the next point
on my line and click and drag out again, like so. And in doing so I’m not
just dropping down a point like in the previous
examples, but by clicking and dragging I am creating
a curve in my line. Now, I’m going to drag
this out, but don’t worry if it’s not the same as
the example below yet. Then upon clicking and dragging on the next point you will see
the vector outline create a curve, which we can pull out
and try to match the worksheet. So I’m going to continue
to use this technique to go around my shape until
I come around and join. Now, this does take a little
practice so if you are new to this it may be a
little difficult at first. So right now that’s pretty close to my worksheet example,
but not perfect. What I’m going to do now is
use the direct selection tool to edit the handles
on the anchor points to edit the curve on my line. By selecting an anchor point
we can now see the handles, these little red lines here. With the direct selection
tool I’m going to click on these handle points and tweak
them to change my outline stroke to match my worksheet
example below. It is important to mention
that as you tweak your curves, try and keep the two handles
as straight in relation to each other as you can. This way you will get
a smoother outcome. If I reveal these examples here
this is really what you want to try and achieve. So after a lot of tweaking
you should end up with a shape like this that should
hopefully match your worksheet. Now, if I press A to pull up the
direct selection tool and click and drag an area over my
shape we can see the handles that make up the shape. That’s looking pretty good. So be sure to practice the
click and drag technique. I find using the click
and drag technique is good for some situations, though
not so good for others. I find this technique requires
lots of anticipation and skill. I find it works for more
experienced illustrators who have a good feel
for the pen tool. So I’m going to select the
shape with the selection tool and delete it because I want
to show you the next technique, the click and convert technique. Now, I use this technique
personally. I often find I lack
control when using the click and drag technique,
especially for big, complex, and intricate trace situations. If you’re a beginner to Illustrator you may find
this technique a little easier. So I’m going to press
P on the keyboard to activate the pen tool and I’m
going to start to trace my shape by tracing down anchor points
along my worksheet like so. Again, remember to try
and use the least amount of anchor points as you can. When tracing a shape you will
have to use some judgement and try to anticipate where you
are going to need anchor points to create an accurate curve. So I’m going to continue
to click around my shape place
down anchor points. I’ll press and hold space
bar and click to move around my canvass and add
points until I come around and connect my stroke
to make a solid shape. So right now that’s
looking nothing like my worksheet example,
but it’s at this point I want to introduce you to the last
pen tool and this is the “convert anchor point” tool. So if we come up to the “pen
tool” menu, like earlier, this time we are going to
select the fourth icon along and this one looks
a little different. When we select this our
mouse cursor will change to an upside down V shape. So with this tool selected
we are going to come down to our shape
we just created. Now using this tool we are
going to add curves to the line. To do this we are going
to move the mouse cursor over the anchor point and
click and drag out like so. As we click and drag out we will
pull out anchor point handles. So this time instead of
clicking and dragging to pull out handles I’m using the
convert anchor point tool to create these manually. It’s important to mention,
if you press and hold shift on the keyboard we can pull
the handles out in increments of 45 degrees, which
can be quite useful. So upon release we have
added curves to that line and we can see the handles
that determined the curve. Now, with the convert anchor
point tool still active we can click on an anchor handle
and move that around to further customize the curve
associated to that handle though on release you will notice
the other handle disappears. If we want to edit the other
handle we simply press A on the keyboard to activate
the direct selection tool, click on the anchor point, and both the anchor point
handles will be revealed and I can go ahead and
edit both handles, like so. We can use this technique
to get some really slim and pointy curved shapes, however I don’t like
that at all. That does not resemble
my worksheet example. So by pressing shift/C on the
keyboard I will reactivate my “convert anchor point” tool. Now I’m going to simply
click on the anchor point and notice how the curve
data will be reset. So this time with the “convert
anchor point” tool I’m going to click and carefully drag
out some anchor points like so, but this time drag along
the line to attempt to copy the shape below. So I’m just going to drag out a
little and on release I’m going to pull out the handle
on the far right like so. So now we have a
nice curve here. Then I’m going to move onto
the next anchor point along and with the “convert
anchor point” tool I’m going to carefully click and drag
out some anchor point handles, though this time dragging
the direction in parallel with my worksheet example. Keep in mind not to try
and get the exact curve with one anchor point. Don’t pull out the
handles too far. Each anchor point works
in harmony with the next. So just give your
stroke a little curve and when you add curve to the next anchor point
you can complete the curve. So remember to do this
in nice and simple steps. Once again, I will release
and tweak a handle like so, but here we can see this
curve is not really matching. So by pressing A on the
keyboard to activate the “direct election” tool,
click on the anchor point and now we can see all the
anchor point handles involved to make this curve and we can
click and tweak accordingly until we get a curve the
same as the worksheet. And we can see that curve
is looking pretty good. So in using these simple
principles I’m going to move around the rest of my shape
using the convert anchor point tool to drag out handles and
use the direct election tool to further tweak those
handles to get nice, accurate, and smooth curves in
the vector stroke line. Now, this does take
a little practice, but when you get the grips
for this you will be able to create any shape you
want pretty comfortably. As mentioned earlier, try and
keep the two handles as straight in relation to each
other as you can. This way you will
get a smooth outcome. And again, if I reveal
these examples here, really what you want to try and achieve are anchor
points nice and straight. So I’m just going to
finish off the shape here. Notice how at first I only drag
out the handles a little bit at first, then come back after
to make the small tweaks. It seems to work
really well like that. And lastly, here on
these two anchor points, soon you should end up with
something that looks like this. Now, if I press A to pull up
the “direct selection tool” and click and drag an area over
my shape we can see the handles that make up the shape. And that’s looking pretty good. So the click and convert
technique is a more simple approach and gives more
initial control and works best in real complex situations. So experiment with both the
click and drag and click and convert technique as you
create your artwork in future. You will find both
techniques useful. So once you are comfortable with
making curves with the pen tool, let’s move onto the next shape. So here I have another
example for you to try. Hopefully you should
be nice and warmed up from the last examples. For this example I’m
going to use the click and convert technique. So I’m going to press P to
activate the pen tool and begin to drop anchor points
around the shape. And when I encounter straight
lines I’m going to press and hold shift and click
to draw straight lines. And soon we should end up
with something like this. But notice, up here
in the top left, we don’t have a straight line. Now, here’s a quick tip to
rectify this; so I’ll press A to get the “direction selection”
tool and click and drag over my two anchor points and upon release this
will select them both. Now, up in the control panel
I’m going to select the “align” button —
horizontal align center — and the two anchor points
will now become aligned with each other to
form a perfect, straight line in the middle. And then I’m going to use
the arrow keys to move them into position, like so. Simple. So once I have my first
outline I’m going to begin to add curves using my
“convert anchor point” tool. So I’ll press shift/C
to activate my “convert anchor point”
tool and begin to pull out anchor handles. And here I’m going to start
and hold shift as I do this to get nice straight handles. And I’m going to continue
around, pulling out handles, and tweaking them, making
sure to keep my handles nice and straight in relation
to each other to get a nice, smooth curve. Again, keep in mind, don’t pull
out the handle points too far. Each anchor point works
in harmony with the next. So just give your handles a
little curve, we don’t need to get an exact trace at first. When you add curves to the next
anchor you can complete the curve, keep it nice and simple,
if you have to tweak some of the handles with the
“direct selection” tool and soon you will end up with
something that looks like this. If I make a selection with the
“direct selection” tool and zoom in we can see how the handles
work in relation to some of the tight corners here. In some cases the handles go
in in line with the stroke. You will discover all
this as you practice and get a feel for the pen tool. So we are going to
finish the shape off by creating the inside shape. With the pen tool I’m
going to drop down points, then use the “convert anchor
point” tool to add curves and edit the handles with
the “direct selection” tool, and soon I will have
something that looks like this. So once you are happy
with that shape, let’s move on to the next shape. If we come across we can see we
have a rather different example. Now we are going to
step things up a little. Here we are going to draw
this simple eye graphic. So this time we have no
guides and we’re going to add a new effect
to our stroke. So for this example we can
use both the click and drag and the click and convert
technique, whichever you prefer. So let’s begin. With the pen tool first I’m
going to click to drop a point at the beginning of this
line and then drag up like so to pull out some handles. Notice, I’m keeping
the handles in line with the worksheet stroke. Then I’m going to come to the
end of the stroke and click and hold to drop
another anchor point. You will see the line begin
to curve, but not enough, so I’m going to drag down
like so to match the curve. Notice, the handle’s
coming out too. And I’m keeping them in
line with the stroke. Upon release we have
our new line. And if I’m not entirely
happy I can use the “direct selection” tool
to tweak the handles. If I delete the line and use
the click convert technique with the pen tool I will simply
drop a point on the start of the line and one on the end,
press shift/C to pull up the “convert anchor point” tool
and simply click and drag on the first point to
pull up some handles. Then click and drag
on the last to pull out handles and add the curve. Tweak the handles and
we have a nice result. So I’m going to continue
to create the lines below. Then I’m going to create a
curve along the first eyelash. Once I’m happy, press V to
activate the selection tool, press command C to copy
and command B to paste. I’ll now have the same line
on top of the next eyelash and paste again to
place one last line on the third eyelash, like so. And soon you will have
something that looks like this. So both techniques; very simple. Once you have created your
paths you may need to use the “direct selection” tool to
click and tweak your handles. We want to try and get the lines
through the middle, like so. Once you have your lines
like mine, come to the center of the eye and focus on
the white shape here. Next we are going
to create the shape. So zoom in and I’m going to
press P to activate the pen tool and drop a point on each corner. I’m going to press
shift/C to pull up my “convert anchor point”
tool, then I’m going to pull out some handles to create a
slight curve on the inside, but notice how I push the
curve on the other side too. Well, don’t worry about
this too much right now. Focus on the inside part and
once you have a little curve, with the “convert anchor point”
tool grab the top anchor point on the other side and drag it
back into the anchor point. This will remove the curve
where we don’t want it. Next, I’m going to use the same
technique, but on the bottom. Then I will use the
“direct selection” tool to simply toggle the handles
to get a nice, subtle curve. Once I’m happy I will
move to the outside, press A to activate the “direct
selection” tool, click the line, and press shift/C to activate
the “convert anchor point” tool, and click and drag on the points
to pull out handles and begin to add a curve to the
outside of my shape. Then drag in the top handle back
into the anchor point like so and notice how this keeps the
top line nice and straight and keeps the curve
on the line we want. Do this process again on
the bottom, then press A and tweak my handles
accordingly. And there we have
that shape covered. Now, if we click on the shape
we just made and look in the “tools” menu at the bottom we
can see this shape has a stroke with a transparent fill. Next I’m going to create
the eyeball section, and we need this shape to
be a solid white shape. So before we create the eyeball
section we need to change this or we are going to lose our
stroke on top of the black. So with the new shape
selected I’m going to come over and click the “default
fill” and “stroke.” And upon click, this shape
will now have a white fill and a black stroke. Nice. So now for
the eyeball section, though this time we are not
going to use the pen tool. We are just going to quickly
draw an ellipse shape. So next I am just going to click
on the ellipse tool, come over and draw a shape, and
press and hold “shift” to get a nice even
circle, like so. And try and create it the same
size as the worksheet example. And upon release we
will place the circle. At the moment this is
white with a black stroke. I don’t want this. So I’m going to come
to the “tools” menu and at the bottom click on the
“swap color fill and stroke.” This will put the
black on the inside. Then I’m going to click on the
“stroke color” and click on the “transparent” icon, the
red dash icon below, to remove the stroke color. Now I cannot see the white
shape anymore so I’m going to right click on the
circle, come down to arrange and click “center back.” And upon click the circle will
be placed behind everything and we can now see
our white shape. Next I’m going to click
on the circle with the “selection” tool, press
command C to copy, and then command V to paste. And with the new circle,
come over to the “tools” menu and down onto the colors. I’m going to click on the
“default color fill” button. This will set it to white
with a black stroke. I’m going to click on the
stroke color and then click on “transparent” icon below. And this will remove the stroke. Now, I’m happy with
my white shape. I’m going to press
S on the keyboard to activate the scale tool, then
press and hold shift and click and drag to scale the
circle down, like so. And soon you should end up with
something that looks like this. Next I want to place
the circle on top into the center of
the black circle. I can do this simply by
selecting the black circle with the “selection”
tool, hold down shift and select the white circle. With them both selected
I’m going to come up to the control
panel and click on the “horizontal align
center” button. That will align them
both to the center. And then click the
“vertical align” tool. Then I’m going to move the
eye into position like so and you should have something
that looks like this. And that’s looking pretty cool,
though the strokes that make up this example look
pretty simple. They currently have the default
stroke path effect applied. When using the pen
tool, by default, it will use the simple stroke. Once we have our stroke we can
apply different stroke effects. So next I’m going to
use the “selection” tool to select the top stroke. Then by pressing and holding
shift I’m going to click on the next two strokes below. So with all the strokes
selected I’m going to come to the control panel at the
top of the workspace and next to our stroke weight we have
a variable width profile. If I click down on this we can
choose from a number of profiles and we can see these are going to alter the dynamic
of our stroke paths. So in this instance I’m going to
select the first width profile. Now if I click off my
selection to deselect we can see that we now have an interesting
stroke affect applied. We can see that the start and
end points seem to taper off in both ends, giving us a
more calligraphic style. So with the strokes
still selected, I’m going to push up
the stroke weight. Let’s say push this up to six, and that’s looking a
little more interesting. With the selection
tool I’m going to select the first eyelash. Press and hold shift to
select the last tool. This time I’m going apply
a different profile. So with this stroke selected
I’m going to come back to the control panel,
click down on the “variable width profile” menu
and select the width profile “four” and push up
the stroke weight. And we have a nice
eyelash effect. Now, it’s important to
mention, at this stage, that when using variable
profiles you need to pay attention to the start and the end point
of your stroke. For example, if I click to
select just one of my eyelashes, if we come to the
“strokes” panel and expand the panel fully
— if you cannot see this, then just click on the up
and down arrows on the tab — on the stroke tab —
to expand it down. At the bottom is the profile
we have set to the stroke. Now, notice, to the right
of this is a little button. This is the “flip alone” button. And if we press this
we can flip the effect. This is very useful if you accidentally draw your
stroke differently to mine and your end point and start
points are in the wrong place. So keep that in mind. Okay, so that’s an
introduction to the pen tool, which works best to
create vector shapes and modify existing
vector shapes. The next tool we’re going to
look at is the pencil tool. The pencil tool is a useful
tool to create freehand strokes and more organic, less uniform
shapes than the pen tool. For this we need to
come to our next row. So if we come over to the main
menu we can find the pencil tool about nine icons down. If we click and hold on the pencil tool we can
see the pencil tool is part of a series. If we place our mouse cursor
over the arrow on the right and release we can snap off
the pencil tool panel like so. So the pencil tool
consists of three tools. We have the pencil
tool, the smooth tool, and the path eraser tool. So let’s begin here by
selecting the pencil tool, or we can use the keyboard
shortcut N on the keyboard. So the pencil tool is used
to draw freehand strokes and is good to achieve a more
freehand, illustrated effect. When the pencil tool is
activated you will notice the mouse cursor change to
what looks like a pencil. So let’s come over and start
on the first worksheet example. So with the pencil tool
I’m going to attempt to trace this half
circle shape here. Now, I’m using a
mouse so I’m not going to draw the smoothest of lines. This tool would probably be best
when used with a pen tablet. You will get a much
smoother outcome initially. So upon release we
can see our stroke. Now, because the pencil tool is
freehand you usually get a more complex vector stroke with
more anchor points along it. Now, if at first you’re
not entirely happy with your path we continue
to use the pencil tool to attempt to refine the line. If we draw on top of the path
we can continually add to it. We can draw on top to create
the whole stroke or simply draw on parts of the stroke to refine
just a particular part we are not happy with until we get
an outcome we are happy with. For the next example
we are going to try and draw a complete
circle shape. So I’m going to draw around the
circle on the worksheet like so and upon release we
will have a stroke line, but notice how it
does not connect. If we look closely we can see
the start and end anchor point. If we draw again on
top of the stroke line over that particular part we can
connect the stroke line like so. And if we want to continue to
refine the stroke we can do so by drawing again on top. Now, as we can see, the stroke
is still not that smooth, and like our previous example,
contains a lot of anchor points. So next we’re going to
use the “smooth” tool. So if we zoom in and come over to the pencil
tool panel I’m going to select the “smooth” tool. So with the “smooth” tool
I’m going to draw on top of my stroke outline, but
remember before using the “smooth” tool the line
must be first active. So after a combination of
refining the stroke line with the pencil tool and
smoothing the stroke with the “smooth” tool we can
get an outcome similar to the worksheet. So with the techniques
we have just learned try and trace this next shape and
see how close you can get to it. Soon you will have something
that looks like this. So once you are happy with
that exercise let’s come across to the next example. Here I want to demonstrate an
occasion the pencil tool may be best appropriate. So here is an example
of a rose illustration that was created
using the pencil tool. Now, you may have an
illustration you scan in or want to trace. I have an example here. So using the pencil tool
I’m going to trace my sketch like so; clicking and drawing
lines over my rose sketch. Now, because this is quite an
illustrative effect we don’t have to be too specific. Soon you will end up with
something that looks like this. So now we have many stroke lines that create a simple
illustration. If, at any point, you wish
to refine a line press A to activate the “direct
selection” tool, select the stroke, then
press N for the pencil tool and draw on top to refine. So with the “selection tool”
I’m going to draw an area over my illustration like so and that will select
all the stroke lines. I’m going to press command
C to copy and then command V to paste, then move
my new example across. Now, when using the
pencil tool, by default, it will use the simple stroke, which is very similar
to the pen tool. Once we have our stroke we can
apply different stroke effects. Earlier, when we
created the eye sample, we applied some variable
profiles. Let’s look at how this will look
with a similar stroke effect. So with all the strokes
selected, I’m going to come to the control panel at the
top of our workspace and next to our stroke weight we have a
“variable width” profile menu. If I click to drop this down
we can choose from a number of profiles and we can
see these are going to alter the dynamic
of our stroke paths. So in this instance I’m going to
select the first width profile. Now, if I click off my
selection to deselect we can see that we now have an interesting
stroke effect applied. We can see the start and
end points seem to taper off on both ends giving us a
more calligraphic appearance. Next I’m going to press V to
activate the “selection” tool, then press and hold shift and
select some of the stroke lines, then come and push the
weight of the stroke, and there we have an
interesting effect. So that’s a brief demonstration
of the pencil tool, a useful tool to create freehand
strokes and more organic, less uniform shapes, which
we can add various stroke effects to. The last tool we’re going to
look at is the brush tool. Now the brush tool can
be found in the menu just above the pencil tool. Before we attempt to use the
brush tool we should first open the brushes panel. I have my brushes panel here
on the right, but if you can go and select brushes from there. Depending on what version
of Illustrator you’re using, this may be a little different
for you, but essentially if we look in the brushes panel
we can see a few brush presets. At the top we have
some stroke definitions and below we have some texture
and pattern definitions. Now, one of the main differences
between the brush tool and the pencil tool is that
you cannot create vector shapes using the brush tool like you
can using the pencil tool. The brush tool is simply
used to create brush strokes. Unlike the pen and pencil tool
the brush tool is dependent on the brushes panel. When you draw using the pen and pencil tool we create vector
stroke lines and shapes based on the default vector paths. When using the brush tool
we use the brush effects from the brushes panel. So let’s come to
the first example. I’m going to press B to
activate the brush tool and over in the brushes panel I’m going to select the basic
brush definition and begin to draw like so. Now, what you will notice
with the brush tool is that when you create a brush
stroke you don’t see the vector outline. The brush stroke
is simply placed. Also, if I’m not happy with that
initial line I cannot draw back over it like I could
with the pencil tool. It just creates another
brush stroke. So I’m going to undo that to
finish off my first example until I have something
that looks like this. If I press V I can select
each individual brush stroke and apply all the “selection
tool” functionality. If I want to tweak the
line, such as the weight, I can do so by coming
to the “stroke option” and pushing the stroke
weight up or down like so. If I want to edit the
stroke path we can use the “direct selection” tool,
click on the anchor point, and tweak the anchor
point positioning and the handles like so. If we select all the
brush strokes using the “selection” tool we can
add new brush definitions. With them all selected I can
come to the brushes panel and click on one of the many
brush definition presets on offer to get a wide
range of artistic effects. Now, these brush definitions
don’t only apply to brush tool. For example, I’m now going
to copy and paste some of my examples I created earlier
using the pen and pencil tool and if I select one of
the shapes using the “selection tool” then come
over to the brushes panel and click a definition
we can apply that stroke effect very easily. Now, in the brushes panel, if
you look at the bottom left, there is a little icon. We can click this to call
up the brushes library menu and from here we can
access a lot more pattern and texture brush definitions. In this case I’m going to
select “borders and decorative” and up will pop a new panel. I’m going to select
my “R shape” here and apply an accordion
fold effect, then tweak my stroke weight
and that’s looking pretty cool. Lastly, I’m going to select
my pencil tool example and from this I’m
going to choose the “charcoal feather”
brush definition, tweak my stroke weight, and
that’s looking pretty cool. So that is how we can
use the brush tool, but also apply brush definitions to vector paths created using
the pen and pencil tool. So the big question is; what
is the best tool for what job? Well, to put it simply; if
you’re creating very clean, geometric, edgy artwork then the
pen tool is your best choice. Though if you’re creating hand
drawn artwork, tracing a sketch, or seek to create
more organic shapes, then the pencil tool
is the one to use. The brush tool is also a
good option for drawing or tracing hand drawn sketches,
though if you’re drawing in Illustrator, especially
with a mouse, then you may not get the
right outcome initially. The pencil tool offers you
tools to help you perfect and control your outcome much
more than the brush tool. So that covers the drawing
tools in Adobe Illustrator. In the next video we are
going to be taking a look at the blob brush tool
and the eraser tool. Now, the blob brush tool
allows us to draw similar to the brush tool by
drawing freehand strokes, though unlike the brush tool the
blob tool does not work along a vector path. The blob tool essentially
creates and builds vector shapes. The eraser tool works to
remove parts of a vector shape. So I’ll see you in
the next video.

100 thoughts on “Drawing with the Pen tool, Pencil tool & Brush tool Ep10/19 [Adobe Illustrator for Beginners]

  1. I'm in a Graphic Design course, just started, never used Illustrator, a lot of the class have done a pre course in the college, everyone is streets ahead, I'm already behind, the teacher is so fast, I have missed steps, and he's gone too far to ask then, so I'm sitting there lost, this is so helpful, disheartened looking around the class and everyone is well ahead of me and I don't know how to get there because I have missed simple things like this! The shortcuts especially! Thank you so so much!!

  2. For years I have been ignoring the pen tool in photoshop after using it this much in ilust I finally feel comfortable with it

  3. Oh man thank you! Your tutorials are the best I have found for the pen tool! Really appreciate your time putting these together! 🙂

  4. Just WOW! Thanks to your very informative (and very well compact) videos, I now understand a lot more about these advanced graphic design tools which have otherwise remained esoteric to me for so many years.

  5. Such an amazing quality of tutorials out there for free. Wow. I have seen pathetic e-courses on websites asking hundreds of dollars to enroll. May God Bless you sir and may He give some sense to 38 people who have unliked the video

  6. WOOW YOU SIR ARE AMAZING!
    Thanks a lot for your efforts in doing this!!! Autonomous learners like me REALLY appreciate your work!!
    Best videos I've ever seen… Seriously.

  7. i just would say something that maybe can reward you in a religiouse way . may god guide u through the right path . u deserve to be rewarded because in my colture .. the one who gives a source income to another .. all the rewards it comes in it will roward u also . may god bless u

  8. my adobe illustrator are not working i mean the trial is expired and i can't keep my practice so please help me to open and crack my adobe illustrator ,or send me the link of crack file.

  9. Great masterpieces, keep up. Keep educating us to make this world a better place. Merry Christmas and a prosperous 2018+ years

  10. I was noticing my lines were gray. It was my trasnparency. Set it higher and im good. Just in case anyone else had this issue.

  11. Great video, I have Windows 10 when I try to extract a file it gives me error messages do you have an updated file or how can I correct this?

  12. how do you create the diagram in the background? so that i can trace thing nice and learn by my self.The one ON WHICH PEN TOLL IS USED.

  13. This course file of Drawing with the Pen tool, Pencil tool & Brush tool can not be found in your folder after extracting the Rar

  14. While using pen toll some of anchor points are disappeared…. What to do? Please reply with your solution..

  15. Hello sir
    The problem with my Adobe 2018 cc is that when i practice on your made artboards sometimes your guidlines are hided when i am practising and some times i can't see my made whole artwork…. Please help me i am so worried

  16. actually if a pencil or pen clashes with th vector made befroe using that tool the previous vector disappears

  17. Not sure if he said this is his video, but you can also tweak anchor handles using the convert anchor point tool instead of the direct selection tool.

  18. I am totally new to Illustrator, I can't believe how much I learned by watching just a few of your videos!

  19. Thank you so much for these tutorials! They are the absolute basic but that's exactly what I needed having just started looking into AI. <3

  20. When using the pencil tool, is anyone getting a bounding box around their pencil stroke, even before you close it to make an actual shape? This is happening to me and I'm wondering why.

  21. Thanks for the tutorial. It helps me discover the uses of some tools I've never tried before and also to refresh on the basics in case I missed out some stuff.

    I wish to add another method in which you can remove part of a handle. You can activate the "Convert anchor point tool" (Shift+C on Win) then click the end point of a handle that you wish to remove. This method will prevent you from messing up the other handle as you try to move the current handle to the anchor point to remove it.

  22. I'm not sure how to go about changing the pencil tool so that it replaces the strokes rather than just draw over it on tracing the circle. If anybody has an answer that it would be very much appreciated.

  23. You're the source of inspiration to me. I had no passion in this software but with your tutorials, I'm almost an expert in it. Thank you so much for dedicating your busy time to produce such outstanding work. May the Lord/Halla bless you so much and how I wish I could meet you one-on-one. #fromkenya

  24. Just stopping by to thank you and echo the previous positive comments regarding this series. It's fantastic, to the point and really easy to follow (or at least as easy as it can be). Well played on making this resource free and offering the donation option. Consider it used. Thanks again, from Derry, Ireland.

  25. You've just fully changed my life. Thank you so much for this. You're definitely gonna go to heaven even if you don't believe in stuff like that.

  26. I had only known how to use the pen tool. The pencil and smooth tools will make drawing so much easier! Thanks for the tutorial. 🙂

  27. Seriously! Thank you so much! i don't think learning Illustrator would have been as much fun had if it hadn't been your videos 😀

  28. I like how he takes special care to mention the little detail regarding stroke profile direction at 31:47, despite the fact that most people might not face that issue. These are extremely well-prepared and well-thought videos!

  29. This changed my life, really! Thank you so much; it's simple but informative and free. I encourage you guys learnt from his tutorials to donate him (on his website) some money if you are able to. Anyways, hello from Cambodia. 😉

  30. hello sir, i want to ask you that by learning from this course is it enough to make my graphic designs professionally.

  31. Downloaded the free project zip file, although it was meant for mac, but I opened in in window. Rar didn´t work. Thanks, thanks so much for your contribution. In scull example, which is going for print, I will learn tracing and then inversion of the (2)vectors, where outline is black and inside all the shapes in individual vector that can be SMYK and Pantones colored. Fundamental stuff I should say. Great!

  32. Sir I get this episode's file with version cc as a *Compressed folder error*….FOR ALL OTHER IT CAME WELL AND I HAVE BEEN PROGRESSING WELL…Just for this sir..what can I do…kindly help me sir

  33. I'm facing a problem, it is that whenever i use the pen tool and make closed shape for instance a circle the parts behind it are not visible , as i was practicing by make R so when i started making it from outside , the closed area that's inside was not visible at all . I'll be thankful if u tell me how to solve this problem

  34. Hi, I'm trying to access the practice file for this episode but none of the version seems to be working, AI says "This file cannot be found"' Did anyone experience this please? If you still have the original working file, kindly send to my email, would really appreciate it.. [email protected]; Thanks

  35. Thank you master!! great video =D, I had wish for many years to learn to handle this programs, and now finally I am been able to.

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