Arts and Humanities in the Creative Economy

Arts and Humanities in the Creative Economy



today it's all about showcasing all the HRC funded projects that are engaging academics in the arts and humanities for the creative economy some people say it's worth about 9% of GDP which is a heck of a lot of money and it is a mix of artistic endeavor and of course we have a number of headline projects which would include the four traits of the economy hubs for knowledge exchange which look at different areas of the face of economy from designed to the so called experience economy we're also looking at copyright through the create Center based in Glasgow and we're also doing a number of other things to study the way in which the creative economy functions its dynamics and its potential a big sculpture which I see funded University the design of the company is actually based on pom so what you'll see now is Rachel Cooper from create fix Jane's land cluster appear and here she is making a presentation about creates exchange you can see there's various things going on in the space so we have a real world coffee shop made from real items physical items then we have the hologram like apparition and we have a rear screen at the back it's not these are new technologies it's far from that these are old technologies melded with new to create interesting spaces for play really we have 22 PhD students that are working with us as part of the crater exchange in three institutions and they are getting very much involved in these projects working with companies as collaborators and we found some really exciting stuff coming out of these which is benefiting the companies they're working with and also creating some really interesting topics for their thesis and working on exploring what actually is the digital public space and how it can add value for the creative economy the accretive economy is part of the economy that seems to be out to perform in it so obviously there's been a huge amount of energy and innovation and growth some of that driven by technological innovation so the digital economy is obviously very important but actually the whole of the creative economy has remained vibrant perhaps because it's based very much on micro enterprises and small enterprises they're a little bit better at bending and flexing so I think they've been surprisingly innovative and successful and lots of the companies we were working with they're really growing and doing very well one needs to do focus groups one needs to listen to one customer one needs to do user studies and look at the user experience my expert playing I'm showing this chandelier which is one of two tuples this one's got to dance with and dancing with knees and it's not one called applying skirt both motion-sensitive spinning chandeliers that change both shape depending on the amount of motion around them created West London put me in partnership with Canberra college bars fact University of Arts London and I used their workshop facilities and studio space in order to essentially provide me the time to play and develop carriages another are big investments is the copyright sensor the create Center at the University of Glasgow looking at digital technologies and their impact on issues of intellectual property and copyrights in the creative economy and they'll be hosting some debates looking at the old question and also the question of how universities can help or hinder with IP issues in terms of engaging with the creative economy so we brought with us um Queen Anne from from 1709 which was the passage of the first Copyright Act in the United Kingdom we spoke to media professionals people working in broadcasting and media companies they were telling us that increasingly creative people need to understand copyrights because you know they can't just pass issues off to the legal department anymore it needs to be sort of at the beginning in the inception of the project they need to be thinking about copyright in their work so we've got lots of interest from media freelancers and media professionals what pirates doing is connecting designer fashion sector and individual companies with academics and university level research so that they can keep innovating within their business so this project has demonstrated a new production technology for polyester fabrics which is laser welding hand laser finishing at the same time so it's we've got a zero waste garment so there's no waste in the hand cutting and this is developed by dr. Carrick goals worthy and the company worn again who are an upcycling company looking to develop more robust infrastructure for new processes for the whole of the fashion industry so very wasteful illness we decided on a theme with our business partners and we put out a call we then invite people to come to ideas labs they then generate a bunch of ideas and connections and contacts which we then curate into a series of applications and an application procedure and we award money the principle in this is that of crowding diversity or trying to get lots of different kinds of people together from the ideas lab through to funneling them into this sandbox process we are looking at the potentials of waterways and their environment for the communities and the businesses of the neighborhood in this case of a forgotten stretch of London's waterway system so the Limehouse cut is the first London Canal in a challenging environment in Tower Hamlets we are collecting information sharing it with all stakeholders asking them to have ideas for the future and make propositions we had contributions from artists from planners from developers and we're right now looking to progress this onto stage 2 where we take forward some of the ideas of the stakeholders and actually from the point of view of employment production of the kind of economic value this is hugely hugely valuable this is a celebration of what the edge Chelsea has done we are very proud of it but it's also I think a celebration of partnership and of collaboration and that I think is the animating spirit around the group of people who are here today but joining all the dogs you know all the other research is going on in the UK and you know the other people and the opportunity to actually meet with them and say hey I really like what they're doing and I want to connect with you and look at how the two bits of knowledge that are both generating and actually forms it's absolutely fantastic to come to an event like this and see so much exciting and activity taking place I think the arts have been not so good it's standing up and saying how economically valuable they are into the country so when you begin to see it here and you physically see people they're doing exciting things exciting things are happening you really do understand how important it is to us I mean arts and humanities researchers are all about exploring what it means to be human and so actually if you think think of it from that perspective almost anything comes into play

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