Art Visit: İstanbul | Sia Moore

Art Visit: İstanbul | Sia Moore


Hi, I’m not architect Banu Altay obviously, I’m Gencay from Sia Moore. And don’t worry she will be coming back next week! And today I’m here to take you to one of the most enchanting and historical mansions of İstanbul which in the early 20th century use to home to the last caliph of Ottoman Dynasty: Abdülmecid. And the glory of this iconic mansion continues to this day by
hosting the much-loved contemporary art exhibitions of Turkey. Walking inside the historical mansion, you’ll see a huge giraffe, a gigantic pair of feet a wooly bicycle, headless children and sketches from beloved classic ‘The Little Prince in an hectic yet colorful space assembled together for this exhibition “The Child Within Me”. Since its’s openning on late September, the show’s been greeted with an intense visitor interest, and naturally it’s extended till December 29. So, for those who wish to visit İstanbul make sure to stop by this gorgeous mansion besides Bosphorus and the intriguing exhibition inside. A century ago, lived here an Ottoman caliph, who was born in 1868 as the Son of Sultan and cousin of Abdulhamid; raised as a well-educated and cultured young man, Abdülmecid was known with his interest for arts and culture. He was taking painting classes from the acclaimed 19th century orientalist painters Salvatore Valeri and Fausto Zonaro. You can visit Abdülmecid’s paintings at the famous Dolmabahçe Palace today.The palace here presumed to be designed and built between 1880-5 by Alexender Vallaury the architect of many gorgeous palacaes, hotels and banks of late 19th century İstanbul architecture. Firstly owned by Enver Pasha, the mansion was bought later by by the last Sultan of Ottoman Dynasty, Abdülhamid the Second. He, then bestowed this colorful palace to his cousin Abdülmecid, for him to practice his passion for painting and music.However, Abdülmecid could only spent two brief years at this mansion.
Upon the foundation of Turkish Republic the caliphate system was abolished, which led Abdülmecid and his family to exile Turkey and moved to France; where he died in 1944. The mansion however, was transferred to government. Following a change of several owners, the mansion is currently owned by a family, whom opens this gorgeous mansion to public by sponsoring exhibitions inside.
So, made out of wood, this three-floored mansion is a nineteenth-century reinterpretation of traditional Ottoman architecture. You see, the external facade of the building is painted and decorated with flower motifs that actually provides a joyful look. On the impressive gateway which is designed by Abdülmecid is inscripted “There is no victor but God”.
Which actually highlights the humble persona of a believer. The interiors of this wooden mansion represents the characteristics of the typical late Ottoman Architecture.
We immediately come across with a decorative style that borrows both from the East and West. Hanging down the atrium a splendid arabesque-style chandelier welcomes visitors inside. Curated by Károly Aliotti, the exhibition hosts to more than 100 works by 60 artists that remind visitors of the things that usually exists in childhood and fades away with adulthood; the artworks invites us all to listen to the child within us. As fantastic and playful the artworks here seem, they still carry the grotesque feel that reminds us death and the innocence we’re losing over time. Bye for now! And don’t forget to subscribe to Sia Moore and comment below if you like this video! Stay tuned!

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